Experimental musical collaborations – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 10:22:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Experimental musical collaborations – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Seattle U community reflects on 2021 music releases – the Spectator https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/seattle-u-community-reflects-on-2021-music-releases-the-spectator/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/seattle-u-community-reflects-on-2021-music-releases-the-spectator/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 02:20:19 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/seattle-u-community-reflects-on-2021-music-releases-the-spectator/ Throughout the year, there were delays, surprise releases, unexpected collaborations, and several first releases that put new artists at the forefront of popular culture. The Seattle University community shared their thoughts on this year’s musical selections. Q: What has been your favorite album of the year so far? Lachlan Soughan, major in first year of […]]]>

Throughout the year, there were delays, surprise releases, unexpected collaborations, and several first releases that put new artists at the forefront of popular culture. The Seattle University community shared their thoughts on this year’s musical selections.

Q: What has been your favorite album of the year so far?

Lachlan Soughan, major in first year of world affairs:

Personal preference I would say “Donda” by Kanye West. The album is a tribute to his mother and I really appreciate the more emotional side of Kanye. Overall it was a very solid and somewhat touching album.

Ella Rustin, KXSU promotions director in second year of communication specialization:

“Probably ‘Glow On’ by Turnstile. They’re a punk / metal band and they’ve released a new album that’s very different from what they’ve done before.

Jeffrey Bowen, professor of music theory and guitar at the University of Seattle:

“I don’t have such a broad view of the current pop scene, but choosing things at random, I thought about Halsey’s latest album, ‘If I can’t have love, I want power. ‘ It’s interesting to have Trent Reznor involved in a project like this… I don’t know if I was a Nine Inch Nails fan, but I definitely got into this music and recognized it as really well done to say the least… I think she had a record with a different tone than she wanted. I think she got pregnant while recording and wanted to express the ups and downs of that experience.

Q: Were there any specific releases this year that you were expecting? Did they meet your expectations?

Soughan: “Well, Drake obviously dropped his album, ‘Certified Lover Boy,’ which I enjoyed. He grew up on me. But I’m also waiting for a Travis Scott album called “Utopia”. I’m really excited because Travis Scott is a pretty unique artist in the sense that he sort of goes from different sides of the spectrum.

Patch: “I would probably say Kanye West’s ‘Donda’. I’ve been waiting for this album for over a year and it was really good. Also the new album from Suicide Boys.

Bowen: “The honest answer, to establish my point of reference, was the new release of a band called ‘At the Gates’. It’s a melodic Swedish death metal band that has been around for a while, so I’m just following some of that: bands that appeared in an earlier era and continue, still making heavy music. I think the Halsey album fits that category. I heard stories about the production, so I was very curious how it was going to sound… I became aware of St. Vincent, and every record I heard was a little different… I was curious to see what she was gonna do on this new record [‘Daddy’s Home’]; what was the presence of his guitar? I was finding a lot of reviving soul and R&B sounds that are sort of fused with his songwriting, which also tends to be a bit darker.

Q: Do you think listeners in general demanded music at a faster pace, or were they more willing to accept the circumstances created by COVID-19?

Soughan: “With our generation now, it’s a lot of instant gratification. Especially in the era of COVID-19, when everyone is on their phones and on social media, it feels like we’re always looking for something to drop… I respect the artist’s time. It’s a tease when they say it’s gonna fall and it’s not going, but in reference to Kanye he delayed his album for a few months and people were really mad because he didn’t fall, but write a scrapbook about the most important person in your life and share it publicly with the world, you should have any time.

Patch: “I think because the concerts weren’t available, people expected more music from artists. I guess they thought artists would have more time to work on albums because they can’t really go on tour, but at the same time I think a lot of people understood how bad COVID-19 was. hard on musicians, and how they did it. t have resources to help fund projects.

Bowen: “I really don’t know… I saw two trends. One is, yes, hungry for new music and be more hungry for the performing arts. And in the meantime, they can stick with their record collection or Spotify. Also diving back in music they may have listened to in earlier times in their lives. You know, college students, but also thirties, forties, sometimes fifties who go back to their record collection and want to learn how to to play these things.”

Q: Have you been listening to older or newer music in the past few months?

Soughan: “It’s a great mix. When I work out it’s definitely rap, but when I relax on my own I like to put on classics and Beatles and stuff because I grew up with a lot of old rock and rock / pop songs. 70s and 80s.

Patch: “I feel like this year I’ve taken to a lot of older music. I got really interested in a lot of experimental bands from the ’90s and stuff like that, and obviously any new artist that I liked if they released stuff, but I really like listening to bands from the’ 80s and ’90s. I really loved this Slowdive band, it’s like a shoegaze band, they’re really good. Recently I’ve been really into ’90s hip hop like The Pharcyde, A Tribe Called Quest. I also really like Lauryn Hill.

Bowen: “Both! Two things have happened: I’ve realized that if I’m on my own, I can lose touch with what’s going on right now. Part of that is feeling the need to be diligent. in exploring new releases. And I had a tendency to go back and fill in some gaps in my listening. Some bands that I had listened to, I just realized that they have released six albums since I stopped paying attention to it.


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Alex Lifeson “Not Interested” in New Tour https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/alex-lifeson-not-interested-in-new-tour/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/alex-lifeson-not-interested-in-new-tour/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:35:26 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/alex-lifeson-not-interested-in-new-tour/ Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson has ruled out going on tour again, saying he was more than tired of the experience after four decades on the road. He said he expected to miss being on stage when Neil Peart’s death brought Rush’s career to a definitive end in 2020, but he has since realized he doesn’t […]]]>

Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson has ruled out going on tour again, saying he was more than tired of the experience after four decades on the road.

He said he expected to miss being on stage when Neil Peart’s death brought Rush’s career to a definitive end in 2020, but he has since realized he doesn’t mind. at all.

Lifeson, who is currently working on a record with Coney Hatch’s Andy Curran, recently said Guitar world: “I don’t really think about that. It’s hard enough to try to release this album first. … To be honest with you, I don’t think I have the guts to go on the road. I mean, if it was a handful of shows it might be fun, but anything beyond that … After 40 years in hotel rooms, I’m not interested. I have enough. I love my home life.

His other projects include launching a custom electric guitar, while he recently recorded a track with Tom Morello and Kirk Hammett. He’s also previously said there’s a possibility he might work with former Rush band member Geddy Lee again, although that doesn’t involve using Rush’s name.

“I thought I would miss being on stage a lot more, but I really don’t,” Lifeson explained. “I did a few things here and there. Small things… it’s usually a charity event or something. It’s pretty fun getting up and playing with other people, but the whole production – the big giant machine – doesn’t really appeal to me now. “

Top 50 progressive rock artists

From Kansas and Can to King Crimson and Curved Air.


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K-Music 2021, hitting the right note for music fusion. By Tim Cumming https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/k-music-2021-hitting-the-right-note-for-music-fusion-by-tim-cumming/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/k-music-2021-hitting-the-right-note-for-music-fusion-by-tim-cumming/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:20:11 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/k-music-2021-hitting-the-right-note-for-music-fusion-by-tim-cumming/ Since then, he’s brought an eclectic range of Korean bands and musicians to stages in the capital, from the sad storytelling tradition of Pansori, to the sound attack of bands like Jambinai or Black String. , multidisciplinary music and dance from Noreum. Machi, the extraordinary sound of the gayageum – half harp, half oud, half […]]]>

Since then, he’s brought an eclectic range of Korean bands and musicians to stages in the capital, from the sad storytelling tradition of Pansori, to the sound attack of bands like Jambinai or Black String. , multidisciplinary music and dance from Noreum. Machi, the extraordinary sound of the gayageum – half harp, half oud, half theramin – under the hands of the composer Kyungso Park – as well as jazz groups like the Near East Quartet, or the Korean doowop of the Barberettes.

Then there were the collaborations with British artists – like saxophonist Andy Sheppard working with Kyungso Park for an unforgettable night performance at the Royal Albert in 2016, and in 2017 Northumbrian piper Kathryn Tickell took the stage with the band. . Black String, conducted by Yoon Jeong Heo on Zither-like Geomungo. “The audience didn’t know what hit them,” Tickell remembers fondly. “There was that excitement on stage – we knew we were pushing this, but we all loved it. “

The audience didn’t know what hit them – we knew we were pushing, but we all loved it

This year’s festival opens tonight at Kings Place with pop-rock cabaret band AD67, drawing on sacred shamanic and secular ritual and folk music from the Hwanghaedo region in western Korea. Nord to deliver a quintessentially immersive and engaging performance we’ve come to expect from K-Music.

Later in the month, North and South Korea and Wales unite in a musical fusion of Welsh violin music from Gayageum and Angharad Jenkins, while in November British saxophone star Camilla George joins Korean experimental drummer Soojin Suh as part of K-Music and the EFG London Jazz Festival.

“When I was invited to collaborate, my first thought was that I didn’t understand music. I didn’t see where I would fit into that sound, ”Tickell recalls of his collaboration in 2017.“ It was intimidating at first. I had heard their music, I had their album and I felt consumed by it. She and Yoon Jeong Heo – both strong female conductors and songwriters – began exchanging emails with pieces of music, going back and forth about what would work best in the space between two very different cultures. How did Tickell negotiate this space? “The key is not to compromise what you are doing, so if you can find something that everyone is feeling, that what they are doing is portrayed to the best of their ability. But all of these other things are happening as well. , and somehow it’s greater than the sum of its parts, so that’s what I want.


For Geomungo player Yoon Jeong Heo (photo), it was about entering the flow embodied by each of the two folk traditions, from South Korea and northeast England. “I could feel the spiritual depth of Korean classical musical instruments in the pipes of Northumbria,” she recalls, “and the inherent sad emotions seemed to match well. You are maximizing your own strength while using sounds that the other person does not have. If you grab the important point of your partner’s music and layer it on top of your completely different sound, it creates more three-dimensional music.

This was, of course, Yoon’s first time performing with Northumbrian bagpipes. “It was really exciting. I always feel my horizons widen whenever I collaborate with new music, new instruments and new genres, and this collaboration was filled with things that I couldn’t have experienced, and I could feel the meaning of a long history through the music of their performers.

“The main motivation was to get this music out,” Tickell adds, “in any way. It was like that, and it was really awesome. There are pictures of me and Joon looking at us on scene, and you can just see the connection, the fun of what we were doing.

For this year’s festival, Yoon and the band Black String are collaborating with guitarist Nguyen Le at the opulent Grand Junction in Paddington on October 28. Nguyen was a guest on the band’s excellent ACT album, Karma. “Because Black String’s music is energetic and so rich in sound, we have to restructure it to match the music of the guests when we play with them,” Yoon explains. “With the power of Black String and the intensity of Nguyen Le meet, the energy increases.”

The three-way mix of Welsh violin player Angharad Jenkins, Gayageum of Kyungso Park (pictured) and North Korea Gayageum performer Soona Park will visit the Purcell Room on October 17. “There is a kind of music that only emerges when you and the other performers can feel the sound, absorb it, resonate with it, sway with it, something that can only be done in person,” Soona Park explains. “After listening to the music of Kyungso and Angharad, I could feel that we were on the same page.”

Fusion, for her, is not so much about shared musical roots extending to new branches, but the shared roots of human feeling, from which all music originates. “An instrument is just a communication tool, and it shows the individual style of the person handling it. If you go back in history, there is no country without pain and no one who doesn’t yearn for their home or love for their family, and so I think all the songs and music contain an essential element of humanity.

For Kyungso Park, working with Angharad and Soona, “I feel like we could create some delicate sounds… It was the first time I had encountered Welsh music so closely, and as soon as I heard it, I could feel it. The scales and tones used in Welsh and Korean music are different, the intervals between the notes are different, and the emotion is different. However, there is, strangely, something in common. Either way, you can feel the sadness and the way it touches your heart – these emotions are in common and, because of that, I think both types of music could be healed. It’s music that touches your heart.

For Angharad (photo), “What excites me about their music is that there is a lot of room for improvisation. There are a lot of things based on the pentatonic scale, which is very free and open to improvisation. Kungso and I are similar in that we respect and have our roots in traditional music, but we had a classical training to give us a level of technical skill, and we also love to experiment, improvise and perform in all kinds of genres. . Like fusionists before them, they’ve emailed and Zoomed in, but she can’t wait for rehearsal day, when they can sort things out face to face. “Everything will work out when we can walk into a room and start playing,” she said.

Kyungso agrees. “I look forward to the moment when we meet in person and create sounds together before the show. It reminds me of working with Andy Sheppard … Oh, now I really miss that moment.

“When we play together,” Soona concludes, “it’s all about the music. Music has no borders or demarcations. As people, we are all the same in our essence, and so when this music is performed on stage, it’s more about what is the same, not what is different.


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The 14 best Bill Murray movies ranked https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-14-best-bill-murray-movies-ranked/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-14-best-bill-murray-movies-ranked/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 22:10:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-14-best-bill-murray-movies-ranked/ “Stripes” is one half of a great comedy. The 1981 satire follows slackers John Winger (Murray) and Russell Ziskey (Harold Ramis), both of whom experience a series of personal and professional struggles due to their immaturity. Winger spontaneously decides that his only option is to enlist in the US military and convinces Ziskey to join […]]]>

“Stripes” is one half of a great comedy. The 1981 satire follows slackers John Winger (Murray) and Russell Ziskey (Harold Ramis), both of whom experience a series of personal and professional struggles due to their immaturity. Winger spontaneously decides that his only option is to enlist in the US military and convinces Ziskey to join him. Early in their training at Fort Arnold, Winger immediately runs into his bossy drill, Sergeant Hulka (Warren Oates).

Hulka is flabbergasted by Winger’s lack of interest in legitimately performing his duties and attempts to embarrass him in front of the other interns. However, Winger’s popularity only grew and he became the de facto leader of the wacky recruit group. It’s hilarious to watch Murray and his friends wreak havoc amid Army protocol. Winger and Ziskey also use whatever resources are available to romantically pursue Military Police Louise Cooper (Sean Young) and Stella Hansen (PJ Soles).

The second half of “Stripes” is an absolute mess, as the gang of misfits turn into unlikely heroes when they are sent to Italy and execute a key rescue operation. The events are unrealistic, especially when they steal the EM-50 Experimental Armored Urban Assault Vehicle. However, as much as the story is ridiculous, Murray is nonetheless committed to the crazy change of pace.


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200 most influential musicians of the past 25 years https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/200-most-influential-musicians-of-the-past-25-years/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/200-most-influential-musicians-of-the-past-25-years/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 15:04:05 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/200-most-influential-musicians-of-the-past-25-years/ Brittany Howard thought about calling the album Björk black. What the two composers share, besides their large-scale visions and hurricane voices, is a profound desire for their just due. After the second Alabama Shakes album, Sound & Color, Captured a much more ambitious, almost afrofuturistic side of Howard’s songwriting compared to their early days, she […]]]>

Brittany Howard thought about calling the album Björk black. What the two composers share, besides their large-scale visions and hurricane voices, is a profound desire for their just due. After the second Alabama Shakes album, Sound & Color, Captured a much more ambitious, almost afrofuturistic side of Howard’s songwriting compared to their early days, she got used to people mistakenly assuming that Blake Mills, the band’s co-producer, must have written the songs. . “Now I have to be adamant about what I did,” she said. “So I’ll just say I’m very excited, as a woman in 2019, to have produced this record.”

The album’s most touching moments occur when Howard reconciles the hatred she sees in the world with her own commitment to hope. Written in response to Prince’s death, Trump’s election, and “the whole fucking world looking depressed,” “13th Century Metal” feels like the spiritual centerpiece of Jaime * —an intergalactic journey of a jam session. Howard delivers sermon-like affirmations with unwavering wisdom, almost enthusiastic fury, and yes, a little * all we need is love. “I’m a masters student and my mind…” she shouts, stopping dramatically before declaring, “will never be trampled!”


Photo by Hiroyuki Ito / Getty Images

Between Broadcast’s debut in 1996 and the death of co-founder Trish Keenan in 2011, the British band gradually developed their own sound universe, tinkering with tracks from easy ’60s pop, early electronic music and soundtracks from avant-garde films in recordings that looked like spectral emanations from another world. As Jess Harvell wrote in the days following Keenan’s death:

In the mid-90s, Broadcast was labeled as a clever retro act of mixing genres and collecting records in an era that had no shortage of retro acts of mixing clever genres and collecting records. But there was something deeper and stranger about their music. While Trish Keenan’s vocals were always clear and charming, in many ways of pure indie pop the band was neither cuddly nor elegant. And they had little to do with the retail-friendly post-Portishead brigade or the overpowering surface-level “cool” of any lounge-pop revivalist. On the contrary, they were much closer to Boards of Canada, another warp band, using wobbly, sometimes even filthy electronics to evoke the unreality of everyday life, the beauty of supposedly artificial sound, the supernatural qualities. circuit-based music. The broadcasts exploited older, darker, and often darker styles of American, European, but especially British music: the psychedelic side of old-fashioned synth music, the weirdness of old electronic film and television soundtracks, the phantasmagoric atmosphere of suburban fairy tales evoked by certain Twee and industrial gangs. Granted, there was a lot of ’90s Stereolab-ish kraut-ish and beat culture and even sunny Bacharach-isms in their musical DNA, but Broadcast has never been so easily reducible to one trend or another. .


Photo by Scott Dudelson / Getty Images

Formed around the core duo of Kevin Drew and Brendan Canning, Broken Social Scene was at the epicenter of Toronto’s thriving indie rock scene throughout the 2000s. The insanely grand ensemble includes members of other outfits like Feist , Metric and Stars, but they’ve always achieved a special chemistry when they’re together as a collective. As Ryan Schreiber wrote in a 2003 review of their breakout album You forgot it in people:

I’ve been listening to this record for months on repeat – sometimes just this record for days – but it wasn’t until I started researching this review that he began to understand how a band like this- this could materialize out of nowhere. with such a powerful and touching album. I knew from the liners that the group had 10 members (15 if you include the guests); what I didn’t know was that they all roamed from group to group within the wildly experimental Toronto music scene for years, or that they all came from groups like Stars, Do Make Say Think, Treble Charger, A Silver Mt Zion and Mascott with the unified goal of making, of all things, pop music. One of its members told a Toronto weekly that “we had done our arthouse albums before … the whole ideology of trying to write a real four minute pop song was completely new to me. a lot of us “. Who could have imagined that it would come so easily? You forgot it in people explodes song after song of perfect pop and endlessly replayable.


Photo by Joseph Okpako / WireImage

Burna Boy was born Damini Ebunoluwa Ogulu in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, grandson of a former director of Fela Kuti, and he wears the mantle of this African music icon. Burna calls his own style “Afro-fusion”: a blend of continental sounds with global varieties of hip-hop, EDM and pop. At a time when correcting historical injustices seems more urgent than ever, Burna Boy’s comprehensive Pan-Africanist style is helping to rectify deep imbalances of power and representation. Review of his 2020 album Twice as big, Mankaprr Conteh wrote:


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Rick Wakeman Still Wants To Make New Music Yes: Exclusive https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/rick-wakeman-still-wants-to-make-new-music-yes-exclusive/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/rick-wakeman-still-wants-to-make-new-music-yes-exclusive/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 15:52:06 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/rick-wakeman-still-wants-to-make-new-music-yes-exclusive/ Rick Wakeman is hoping to continue collaborating with Trevor Rabin and Jon Anderson, despite reports that they may be over. Plans for a 2020 tour have been spiked due to COVID, and it “kind of changed the spectrum of everything” as each of the former Yes members provided an update, Wakeman told UCR. “Certainly I […]]]>

Rick Wakeman is hoping to continue collaborating with Trevor Rabin and Jon Anderson, despite reports that they may be over.

Plans for a 2020 tour have been spiked due to COVID, and it “kind of changed the spectrum of everything” as each of the former Yes members provided an update, Wakeman told UCR. “Certainly I would like to do stuff, whether it’s with [Rabin and Anderson] or who it is with, I don’t know, “he said.” But I love playing Yes music. It’s an important part of my life. “

Rabin confirmed last year that Yes with ARW is “definitely finished”. He described the meeting as “a splendid pleasure”, but said that “the problem is that we all live in different places around the world, so logistically it is so difficult to continue.”

The trio had been working together on new music since 2011. They eventually shared a demo of a new song called “Fragile” during a radio appearance on Jonesy’s jukebox in July 2018 – but Wakeman has since had doubts.

“Yeah, we released it. I mean, I think if we had had more time we could have done better,” Wakeman said of the song, in which Rabin and Anderson shared the vocals. “The problem is, Jon lives in San Luis Obispo, Trevor lives in Hollywood and there’s me living on the east coast of England. It’s really tough.”

In the meantime, it rejects the modern concept of recording via file sharing. “You really have to be sitting in the same room,” argues Wakeman. “Two years ago we were looking at how we could actually achieve this, all being in one place – because to be honest, that’s the best way to write music. The best Yes stuff was always written when we were doing it. were all in the same room. “

Wakeman fondly remembers how they spent a month together at the time, “brainstorming”. “We would dissect them and pull them apart. What came out the other side was, to me, pretty magical,” he says. “This is where you got a real Yes album.”

As for Yes, Wakeman hopes “it’s not over,” noting that “none of us are getting any younger. … I’m 73 next year and Jon’s [a few years] older than me. I mean, we’re not spring chickens anymore. But on the other hand, when you go on stage, the years go by, you know? So this is not the end, let’s put it that way, but I can’t tell you what’s next – because I don’t know myself. But that can’t be the end. “

Wakeman returns to the United States for the Even Grumpier Old Rock Star Tour which kicks off October 13. “Grumpy is an interesting word,” he laughs. “It’s a fine line between cranky and angry.”

Top 50 progressive rock artists

From Kansas and Can to King Crimson and Curved Air.

Steve Howe released one of rock’s most hated albums


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20-year-old David Bowie’s LP ‘Toy’ finally gets release date https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/20-year-old-david-bowies-lp-toy-finally-gets-release-date/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/20-year-old-david-bowies-lp-toy-finally-gets-release-date/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 22:16:57 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/20-year-old-david-bowies-lp-toy-finally-gets-release-date/ Twenty years ago David Bowie was talking about releasing an album called Toy, who would present re-recorded versions of some of his songs from his early years (1964-1971) with his new Mark Plati, Sterling Campbell, Gail Ann Dorsey, Earl Slick, Mike Garson, Holly Palmer and Emm Gryner. He wanted to record the album and release […]]]>

Twenty years ago David Bowie was talking about releasing an album called Toy, who would present re-recorded versions of some of his songs from his early years (1964-1971) with his new Mark Plati, Sterling Campbell, Gail Ann Dorsey, Earl Slick, Mike Garson, Holly Palmer and Emm Gryner. He wanted to record the album and release it right after – years before surprise albums were a thing. Back then, of course, albums were mostly released on compact disc, so fast turnaround times were difficult, if not impossible.

Of course, Bowie being Bowie, he quickly became excited about his next album of new music and moved on. He started working on Pagan, which was released in 2002. But now, Toy is finally ready to release, almost two decades later.

Bowie co-producer Mark Plati said in a press release: “Toy is like a moment captured in an amber of joy, fire and energy. It is the sound of people happy to play music. David has revisited and reexamined his work of previous decades through prisms of experience and a new perspective – a parallel that has not been lost to me as I now revisit it twenty years later. Every now and then he used to say ‘Mark, this is our album’ – I think because he knew I was so deep in the trenches with him on this trip. I am happy to finally be able to say that it now belongs to all of us.

ToyThe genesis of happened in 1999 while filming an episode of Storytellers VH1. Bowie wanted to perform something from his pre-“Space Oddity” career, so he went back to 1966 and dusted off “Can’t Help Thinking About Me” for the first time in thirty years. The song remained on the setlist for the short promotional tour of the ‘hours…’ album, and in early 2000, Bowie and producer Plati compiled a list of some of Bowie’s first songs to be re-recorded.

The album will be available on January 7 (the day before Bowie’s birthday) in 3 CD or 6 × 10 ”vinyl format. If you can’t wait that long to hear it, it will be released a few weeks before, on November 26, as part of a new set, DAVID BOWIE 5: BRILLIANT ADVENTURE (1992 – 201). The box will contain all his albums from this period: the years 1993 Black Tie White Noise, the years 1993 The suburban buddha (available on vinyl for the first time in almost 30 years), 1995’s 1.Outside, 1997 Grounding, and 1991 ‘hours…’ with the expanded live album BBC Radio Theater, London, June 27, 2000, the compilation of music outside the album / alternative version / B sides and soundtrack Re: Call 5.

David Bowie: his 40 greatest songs


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Disclaimer Log: Available – Announcements https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/disclaimer-log-available-announcements/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/disclaimer-log-available-announcements/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 18:57:33 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/disclaimer-log-available-announcements/ Active since 2000, Liquid architecture is a leading Australian organization for artists working with sound and listening, based on the unceded Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung Country in Naarm / Melbourne, Australia. Our program sits at the intersection of contemporary art and experimental music, expressed through a range of research, commissioning, presentation and publication activities. In 2019 […]]]>

Active since 2000, Liquid architecture is a leading Australian organization for artists working with sound and listening, based on the unceded Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung Country in Naarm / Melbourne, Australia. Our program sits at the intersection of contemporary art and experimental music, expressed through a range of research, commissioning, presentation and publication activities.

In 2019 Liquid Architecture founded Disclaimer, a new digital reading and writing journal about listening and sound. Our editorial approach integrates the work of artists, writers, activists and researchers, expanding our public programming, while generating entirely new possibilities for critical work focused on sound: audio documents, digital listening interfaces. , artist profiles and interviews with artists, visuals and sound scores, research essays and surveys, poetry, sound archives, audio description experiences, etc.

In addition to the stand-alone pieces, we publish edited dossiers exploring central themes of Liquid Architecture’s curatorial program and our position that sound and listening are always inherently political, relational, situated and contextual subjects. Disclaimer extends Liquid Architecture’s prolific and collaborative research methodology and its long-standing desire to enrich, interweave and charge the reading experience with the force of listening.

Below we share some documents recently released by Disclaimer:

Listening with your fingersIs a material archive documenting and developing the visit of Chilean artist and poet Cecilia Vicuña to Australia at the end of 2016. This dossier includes performances, readings, interviews and collaborations carried out in Melbourne and rural Tasmania with collaborators such as Camila Marambio and Douglas Kahn; alongside poetry readings voicemailed from Vicuña to dossier editors, Joel Stern and Autumn Royal, in late 2020.

Sitting by the fence near the jungle: reflections on the collective Manus Recording Project”Is a collection of writings on the groundbreaking work of the Manus Recording Project Collective, made up of a group of refugees who have documented from within Australia’s immigration detention regimes off-and-onshore, through practices of field recording and audio archive production. Edited by Liquid Architecture partner and lawyer James Parker, the dossier contains essays, interviews and creative thoughts by James Parker and Joel Stern, André Dao and Behrouz Boochani, Poppy de Souza, Andrew Brooks and Emma K. Russell. Recordings of crucial works by the Manus Recording Project collective How are you today (2018) and where are you today (2020), originally commissioned by Liquid Architecture, are integrated throughout, so reading and listening remain in direct dialogue.

Disturbing scores, Co-commissioned by Liquid Architecture and Monash University Museum of Art, is a feature led by First Nations artists from around the world that examines how acts of sound and listening – rooted in the language of sheet music – become vehicles to disrupt the logic of colonization, extractivism, expropriation and appropriation, while at the same time offering powerful affirmations of sovereignty, resistance and the future. Showcasing work by artists and academics including: Megan Cope, Dylan Robinson, Candice Hopkins and Raven Chacon, Rob Thorne and Proposals from the Future.

Other recent highlights from Disclaimer understand:
Iterations: John Nixon“, Tiarney Miekus
Inhuman intelligence: Holly Herndon and Mat Dryhurst in conversation with Sean Dockray
DAW hegemony, “ Michel Terren
Haig Aivazian in conversation with Noah Simblist
Sonaflora Drift scores“, Dylan Martorell
The Test of Time: Clare ‘CRIM’ Cooper“, Jim Denley

Editor Liang Luscombe invites ideas and proposals for Disclaimer at any time, submissions here. If you are interested in supporting Liquid Architecture’s publishing activities, including Disclaimer, and our Podcast, you can do it through a monthly Patreon subscription.


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Perrystead Dairy brings creative cheese making to Kensington https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/perrystead-dairy-brings-creative-cheese-making-to-kensington/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/perrystead-dairy-brings-creative-cheese-making-to-kensington/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 15:46:40 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/perrystead-dairy-brings-creative-cheese-making-to-kensington/ Yoav Perry tries to tame the ocean in the aging room of his new cheese making workshop in Kensington. But the salty brew of local seaweed infusing the brine of filtered seawater for Atlantis, his latest experimental creation at Perrystead Dairy, was surprisingly pungent on the early wheels. “I really thought I figured out what […]]]>

Yoav Perry tries to tame the ocean in the aging room of his new cheese making workshop in Kensington. But the salty brew of local seaweed infusing the brine of filtered seawater for Atlantis, his latest experimental creation at Perrystead Dairy, was surprisingly pungent on the early wheels.

“I really thought I figured out what this cheese was going to do for me and my aging room,” he said, shaking his head at some troublesome early prototypes. “I wanted it to be light and seaside, no fish and full of iodine.”

Perry finally found the fix, adding yeast to the surface of the cheese. before one of the seaweed infused brines, a move that allowed the three-pound rounds to develop a more melt-in-the-mouth consistency, and the kombu effect of puffing through the rich curds with a deep sea umami rather than the previously twang brackish. The finished cheese now has an earthy but balanced flavor with its orange and white rind speckled with seaweed reminiscent of mountain tomme, but with the subtle flavor of surf. Is this the first Jersey Shore tomme in the world?

“Maybe, but I’m not going to call it that!” said Perry. He objected not only to the overly broad nature of the tomme category, but also to the baggage of defining his cheese in European terms. “I am interested in making new styles of seasonal American cheeses. I don’t want to make Italian or French cheese. I don’t want to make a Camembert and just name it after a local stream.

Yes, Israel-born Perry jokingly admits a slight aversion to French terms since being kicked out of the Alliance Française as a child because he couldn’t master the proper accent. But his obsession with creating originals stems from the freedom he sees in American mash-up culture to mix and reinvent cheeses without worrying about the conventions of European traditions, which often dictate precisely how products are. manufactured.

Perrystead’s latest hit, a complex creamy cube with a wrinkled crust called Intergalactic, is a perfect example.

“I take a (vegetarian) thistle rennet which is typically used for sheep’s and goat’s milk cheeses in Spain and Portugal, but then I use it with cow’s milk,” says Perry. “I coagulate it with a slow fermentation in mussels like a Loire goat, then I age it with cultures like an Italian robiola. You could never mix these things into one in these very protective European regions. To put it concisely, Intergalactic is a regional American pooch.

Given that Perrystead only opened its doors this spring, after Perry inserted two prefabricated rooms with cheese-making equipment and an aging cellar into this former musical instrument warehouse, the level of difficulty of his first products is intimidating because there is no roadmap for original recipes. Just trial and error and good instincts.

But Perry, 48, a former digital designer who previously ran an online supplier of cheese equipment to 700 producers around the world, puts his vast knowledge of processes, fermentation and cultures to use like a mad scientist on the go. dairy arts. While most cheese makers won’t use more than a dozen different cultures to affect the development of their cheeses, Perry said, he practically chuckled in glee as he led the way for a small glass freezer where he holds 125 different cultures.

“I love to mix them up and look at them like colors on a painter’s palette,” he said. “They each have subtle differences and you can combine them in different ways to create interesting cheeses. They are truly magical. You design a cheese and imagine what it will taste like in two or three months, then you send them (to the aging room) to do your bidding.

Things didn’t always go as planned, especially at first when a problem with the capacitor forced him to throw in 150 pounds of cheese. More recently, a handling error ruined another 165 wheels.

“A new cave never works as well as an older cave that has become accustomed to the microflora that collects on the walls and shelves,” he said.

Finding reliable employees has also been a challenge. Finding the public’s interest in his cheese failed.

“It started with very complicated cheese and I was afraid people wouldn’t understand it, but everyone really got down to it,” says Ann Karlen of Third Wheel Cheese Company., which locally distributes Perrystead cheese. “For my customers, there is a lot of enthusiasm in buying hyper local cheeses. And people are really excited about the experiment.

At the same time, says Karlen, Perry is also keenly aware that her cheeses must also taste good in an accessible way, a trait she attributes to her business acumen and background in marketing and design.

“He didn’t start (on a farm) milking cows, saying, ‘Now what am I doing with this milk?’ She said. “He decided to open a creamery in town to make cheese for a sophisticated crowd.”

Perry especially enjoyed his location in the heart of the Kensington-Fishtown Manufacturers’ Corridor, where artisan foods ranging from coffee to beer, spirits, bagels and pickles are made in neighboring blocks, and the landscaped patio in front of his dairy. hosts a Foodmaker’s Pop-up Market twice a month.

It is currently the only certified artisan cheese within the city limits of Philadelphia. And the famous author of Tenaya cheese ”Madame Fromage”Darlington says Perrystead’s unusual status as an urban creamery has wider implications.

“It creates a cool access point for city cheese lovers to taste a piece of the countryside, and it raises awareness about the dairy industry in Pennsylvania – an industry where many small farms have been forced to close due to low price of milk, ”she said. . “If we are to maintain a small batch, grass-fed artisan cheese scene in the United States, we need more people like Yoav Perry to develop the dairy community and make it more visible. “

The fact that Perry moved here with his wife and daughter from New York City specifically to start this creamery is also a validation of Philadelphia’s continued appeal as an affordable and accessible destination for creative food entrepreneurs.

“We were so done with New York where the numbers just didn’t make sense,” Perry said. “But it’s a fantastic city that actually has a cheese scene and top-notch restaurants. We are right off I-95 on the Northeast Corridor and surrounded by incredible farmland and world class dairy farmers. The numbers here make perfect sense.

Perry even got help buying production equipment with a state grant of $ 126,039 to support Pennsylvania’s dairy industry, and the dairy, in turn, receives its weekly milk deliveries from the Bucks and Montgomery counties.

Perry’s current challenge has been to pace the growth of what is still a very small start-up that currently only brings in 75 gallons of milk per week. He found immediate success with his Real Philly Schmear, a fantastic whole milk riff on cream cheese whose blend of cultures promotes a crisp flavor and mellow that has satisfying richness over the waxy texture of the competition. industrial.

But as orders poured in from all over the country after a functionality in Food & Wine For the Schmear who is, as the label notes, “actually made in Philadelphia,” Perry quickly realized his conundrum. The limited production capacities of the creamery are better spent on a cheese like Intergalactic, which, after slight aging, is worth almost double.

Schmear, which requires little to no aging, can still be a valuable asset to the growing business, but it’s the kind of low-margin cheese that needs to be produced at a higher volume. Perry is in the process of finding a solution to increase production.

Meanwhile, Perry’s imagination continues to run, aging cheeses drizzled with dry cassis wine from an importing friend, washing rounds in a local beer brewed with WildBrew Philly Sour yeast (created by the University of Sciences), among several other collaborations. The Real Philly Schmear, in fact, started out as a collaboration with Kismet Bagels.

Perry also worked with a local factory to make strips of Pennsylvania black walnut to eventually replace the traditional spruce bark that is currently wrapped around the aging cycles of its next in season cheese. Bottled fermented yogurt and kefir projects are still ongoing.

Perry, whose facility is not open to the public beyond the occasional pop-up patio market, also dreamed of new ways to increase the availability of his products. This includes plans for a cheese vending machine will soon be installed up front to give cheese freaks 24/7 access to their favorite Perrystead curd, stored on refrigerated trays that will function essentially as a sandwich maker.

“But it won’t take cash – Apple will just pay,” Perry says. “Because it’s Philly, after all. I don’t want people to blow it up and get covered in melted cheese.

Perrystead Dairy, 1639 N. Hancock St .; perrystead.com



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Canonize the Disco Classic “I Feel Love” https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/canonize-the-disco-classic-i-feel-love/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/canonize-the-disco-classic-i-feel-love/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 14:53:54 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/canonize-the-disco-classic-i-feel-love/ I Feel Love: Donna Summer, Giorgio Moroder and how they reinvented music Dave thompson Backbeat August 2021 One of the best things pop music books can do is send readers to their favorite streaming service, or better yet, a local record store to find artists and albums they’ve missed. first time. Even the most encyclopedic […]]]>

I Feel Love: Donna Summer, Giorgio Moroder and how they reinvented music

Dave thompson

Backbeat

August 2021

One of the best things pop music books can do is send readers to their favorite streaming service, or better yet, a local record store to find artists and albums they’ve missed. first time. Even the most encyclopedic and obsessive music nerds can always discover artists and albums new to us.

Veteran music writer Dave Thompson’s new book on the wide range of musicians and genres that have influenced and have been influenced by Donna Summer’s “I Feel Love” sent me on a quest to find the first pieces of new wavers Ultravox and before “Don’t You Want Me” Human League, not to mention the lesser-known Eurodisco hitmakers Dee D. Jackson and Marc Cerrone. While I was working in Backbeat Books’ I feel love I managed to create a playlist that has since been the soundtrack of my treadmill time.

Thompson maintains that the singer Gave summer and its producer Giorgio Moroder have “reinvented” pop music, but Thompson also acknowledges that they drew on many existing fashions, technologies and musical influences to create the disco hit “I Feel Love”.

The first half of the book covers a lot of ground, spanning Summer and Moroder’s early careers, the rise of the affordable synth and 12 “single, the ascendancy of avant-garde composers, krautrock, first wave punk. , disco, prog, and the fashion for erotic dance pieces to capture the intricate, eerie artistic fervor that was bubbling up in 1977. One of Thompson’s central claims is that “I Feel Love” emerged from a cultural moment. intensely creative and intensely diffuse, so by necessity, it must present a good part of the context.

Some of this background is already familiar to most fans of pop music. Indeed, much ink has already been devoted to Bowie, Eno, and their Berlin records, so much so that I’m not sure we need another retelling of that particular story. On the other hand, Thompson’s account of the role early electronic devices played in creating Cold War sci-fi soundtracks is enlightening and rightly trippy.

Again, these early chapters seem a bit superficial as Thompson is about to inventory so many different moves. But ultimately, the approach is productive. As Thompson explains in his introduction, “The point is to tell the story of this one song in all directions.”

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie‘S warning about the “dangers of a single story” comes to mind. Adichie suggests that our view of people and places remains anemic and incomplete when we only tell one story about them. To his credit, Thompson offers multiple tales of “I Feel Love”, part disco anthem, seminal example of collaboration, avant-garde anti-hit and proto new wave track.

One of the remarkable accounts is that of Summer-Moroder’s twin trajectories and Kraftwerk, both using synthesizer technology, both working in Germany and both creating ambitious and deeply influential music. I remembered stories of the Beatles and beach boys simultaneously experiencing studio sounds, orchestration and LP as a concept art form, and pushing each other to be great.

Summer-Moroder’s “Love to Love You Baby” and Kraftwerk’s “Autobahn” both became worldwide hits in 1975 and captured the attention of dance fans, rockers and synth geeks. This presaged the almost simultaneous releases of “I Feel Love” and “Trans-Europe Express” even bigger and even more influential two years later.

I was somewhat disappointed with Thompson’s final chapters, which show that “I Feel Love” had reverberations in the worlds of punk and new wave, dance and pop, and experimental music. . Unfortunately I’m not sure this case should be done. Sure the song was influential. And because his point is self-evident, Thompson is essentially repeating this general claim instead of expanding on it.

It traces the beginnings of synth-pop and the new romantic movement in the UK and highlights how much this community loved Summer-Moroder. He moves to New York and the CBGB crowd and makes essentially the same point. Rinse and repeat.

Yet Summer and Moroder’s influence on hip-hop and ’90s rave culture is hardly overlooked. Thompson mentions that a lot of rap tracks have sampled “I Feel Love,” and then basically drop the subject. Thompson points out that artists like the chemical brothers and Daft punk had a lot of affinities for Summer-Moroder collaborations but says little about how rave and EDM became more mainstream and mainstream than ever in the late ’90s. It sounds like oversights, let alone the missed opportunities to explore more critically how the influence of “I Feel Love” took on new and different iterations over the following decades.

But despite these flaws, even the weaker second half of the book is sometimes revealing. Thompson takes an in-depth look at how synth-pop and new wave have opened up new possibilities for experimentation with genres and synths and new opportunities to bring the liberating ethic of disco into the public sphere. The British act like Soft cell, Frankie goes to Hollywood, and Bronski beat understood the sex-positivity and sense of liberation that throbbed both under disco beats and synth lines, and repackaged Summer-Moroder’s sounds half a generation later, reaching a larger audience, increasing the LGBTQ visibility and, well, feeling the love.

At the start of the book, Thompson is right: “Yeah, disco sucks. It sucked everyone up. With that, I’ll start listening to this killer playlist again.


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