Musician – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 22:14:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Musician – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Communities mourn the sudden death of teacher, coach and musician Rob Ambrosino https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/communities-mourn-the-sudden-death-of-teacher-coach-and-musician-rob-ambrosino/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/communities-mourn-the-sudden-death-of-teacher-coach-and-musician-rob-ambrosino/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:51:29 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/communities-mourn-the-sudden-death-of-teacher-coach-and-musician-rob-ambrosino/ Even as Rob Ambrosino was dying, he helped others. This is how the family wants to remember Ambrosino, teacher, trainer and musician. Ambrosino was removed from the resuscitation system on Friday morning at Summit’s Overlook Medical Center. He was hospitalized with a ruptured aneurysm on September 26 and was declared brain dead later that night. […]]]>

Even as Rob Ambrosino was dying, he helped others. This is how the family wants to remember Ambrosino, teacher, trainer and musician.

Ambrosino was removed from the resuscitation system on Friday morning at Summit’s Overlook Medical Center. He was hospitalized with a ruptured aneurysm on September 26 and was declared brain dead later that night.

He was 55 years old.

Ambrosino was predeceased by his brother, Greg, and their mother, Carol. He is survived by his father, Jerry; brother, Gary; wife of 21 years, Kristina; and their children, Erika, 20; Laurent, 17 years old; and Robert, 13 years old.

Niece Alexis Ambrosino’s GoFundMe for Family reached their goal of $ 100,000 in less than 48 hours.

Sparta assistant football coach and former Sparta star Rob Ambrosino speaks with players in training in December 2003.

The funeral will be private, with a celebration of life to be scheduled.

Only 2% of registered organ donors die in the right circumstances – on life support in a hospital – to actually donate their organs. “Essentially his whole body” could be donated, according to Alexis Ambrosino.

Rob Ambrosino’s heart went to a 61-year-old man, the lungs to a 53-year-old man, and the kidneys to two.

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Musician Wahu loses professional account to hackers https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musician-wahu-loses-professional-account-to-hackers/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musician-wahu-loses-professional-account-to-hackers/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 09:16:13 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musician-wahu-loses-professional-account-to-hackers/ Account hacking is very common among celebrities, and popular musician Wahu Kagwi is the latest victim of the global threat. The Sweet Love hitmaker took to her Instagram page to denounce the loss of her business page to hackers. “I’m so sad to report that my professional Afro Siri Hair Salon page has been hacked. […]]]>

Account hacking is very common among celebrities, and popular musician Wahu Kagwi is the latest victim of the global threat. The Sweet Love hitmaker took to her Instagram page to denounce the loss of her business page to hackers.

“I’m so sad to report that my professional Afro Siri Hair Salon page has been hacked. I’m so pissed off. How someone takes away 7 years of hard work yaani … I’m beyond words,” said she declared. wrote, adding that, “Nonetheless, we are working with the Facebook / Instagram team in conjunction with the Communications Authority here in Kenya and I hope it will be recovered…”

The fashion enthusiast has advised other celebrities to use caution when creating pages to avoid similar occurrences. “To all business owners and influencers, please make sure you have 2-step authentication installed on your pages …”

Wahu is married to the famous secular musician, Nameless and is popular for her hit hit nicknamed “Sweet love” which she wrote for her daughter.

As a business-oriented artist, she ventured into the beauty world in 2013 when she launched the Afro Siri salon. The Westland based beauty salon attracts middle and upper class clients and is growing day by day.

You can eat your way to good health

Scientific observations have shown a complete reversal of certain disease states, such as diet-related diabetic states, after strict dietary control.

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The impressive story of Legacy Man, the eccentric roller skating musician of the Heights https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-impressive-story-of-legacy-man-the-eccentric-roller-skating-musician-of-the-heights/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-impressive-story-of-legacy-man-the-eccentric-roller-skating-musician-of-the-heights/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 22:18:25 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-impressive-story-of-legacy-man-the-eccentric-roller-skating-musician-of-the-heights/ In early 2020, Heights citizens reported seeing an elusive man on inline skates playing a guitar, blasting music from a speaker and singing songs for passers-by. Word has spread about the eccentric musician known as Legacy Man. Now, visitors to the MKT Sunset Market, which takes place every third Thursday, can see him perform his […]]]>

In early 2020, Heights citizens reported seeing an elusive man on inline skates playing a guitar, blasting music from a speaker and singing songs for passers-by.

Word has spread about the eccentric musician known as Legacy Man. Now, visitors to the MKT Sunset Market, which takes place every third Thursday, can see him perform his self-produced synthwave songs with original lyrics in English and Japanese.

Legacy Man, or Derek Cooper as he is known in his work as a chemical engineer, says his musical personality did not develop overnight, but was the culmination of a lifetime of personal development and curiosity. creative.

Derek Cooper’s musical figure skating is known as Legacy Man.

Trent Fuelin

“In seventh grade, I stumbled across a comic book store and found pirated Dragon Ball Z VHS tapes that were recorded from Japanese television,” Cooper recalls. “They were captioned and I was able to watch the show before it was dubbed into English.”

Tired of reading subtitles, Cooper used a tape and a set of books his grandmother gave him that taught Japanese phrases and he slowly began to learn the language on his own.

His adherence to the culture led to a love affair with Japanese rock music of the 80s and 90s. Cooper and his best friend Erik, both intrigued by the visual kei movement, decide to form a band.

“Erik bought a drum kit, I bought a guitar and I learned to play on my own,” he explains. “We finally started a garage band in high school with some friends.”

Derek Cooper's endurance-based hobbies, such as triathlons, have helped him prepare for the three-hour skating and dance musical sets he now performs in the heights.

Derek Cooper’s endurance-based hobbies, such as triathlons, have helped him prepare for the three-hour skating and dance musical sets he now performs in the heights.

James patton

After graduating from the University of Texas in 2009, he put down his guitar, entered his full-time engineering job, and chose a new hobby.

“I started doing fun triathlons and eventually IronMan competitions with my dad while working offshore. I learned so much about myself and strengthened my body-mind connection. ”

Cooper married in 2014 and the couple welcomed twins soon after. Spending more time at home, Cooper returned to his musical roots.

“I started tinkering with production software and making electronic synthwave music. Synth is a revitalization of 80s pop sounds and I had been listening to this music for a few years.

The MKT Sunset Market in the Heights hosts Legacy Man at its monthly events.

The MKT Sunset Market in the Heights hosts Legacy Man at its monthly events.

Katie sanchez

“I started making Legacy Man music in 2019 as a way to brainwash my sons to like the same music as me growing up,” Cooper says jokingly. “I had a drum machine, a few synths, and played guitar. In October 2019, I had a few songs that were pretty polite. My 2 year olds were having fits in the car, so I played one of my songs. They stopped, listened and nodded. Their reactions to my songs made me realize that I was on to something.

After rediscovering old roller blades he had received several Christmases before, Cooper strapped them up and Legacy Man took to the streets.

“I was skating on 8th Street and I don’t know what got into me, but I reached out and started singing my song in Japanese at the top of my lungs. It was so liberating, ”Cooper recalls. “For months I sang, skated, took mental notes on the changes I wanted and had fun.

Cooper’s alter-ego has an undeniable ability to bring joy to others.

Derek Cooper says his performances are meant to send energy and light to those who watch them.

Derek Cooper says his performances are meant to send energy and light to those who watch them.

James patton

“At the start of the pandemic, people were walking around with their heads down, and through my IronMan training, by maintaining a high mental and physical state, I became hypersensitive to people’s energy. I was skating in front of someone and felt the need to stop and sing and dance for them. I would stop to talk to them or just skate. I don’t know why, but singing and dancing in the streets made people feel happy. I started to feel like this is what I’m supposed to do. When I was in Hawaii to compete in the IronMan World Championship I had an experience in the lava fields where I felt something was going to happen. I just needed to trust my instincts and I would find the right path. I have the same feeling every time I step out on my skates.


Legacy Man was soon invited to perform at the MKT.

“I do a three-hour set with my skates,” says Cooper. “It’s a question of endurance for me. For me to send energy and light, and for it to be real, it has to cost me something. I have to practice and put everything on the line for others and for myself. I keep moving my feet or playing my heart from 6 to 9 p.m. ”

Cooper emphasizes that his music is really meant for everyone. “Every time I skate and have fun, it’s a natural joy. I feel like I have an abundance of something inside of me. By sharing it with others it maybe inspires them, or sometimes I am in deficit of this light and I can tap into their energy. There is a greater purpose [for Legacy Man] and I’m right here for the ride.



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YASMEEN lives a double dream lives as an engineer and musician https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/yasmeen-lives-a-double-dream-lives-as-an-engineer-and-musician/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/yasmeen-lives-a-double-dream-lives-as-an-engineer-and-musician/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/yasmeen-lives-a-double-dream-lives-as-an-engineer-and-musician/ Yasmeen Nasir lives his life in two different worlds. During the day, she works as a project engineer for the aerospace company Lockheed Martin Corp. She is also a musician in the making. Some may wonder how an engineer has time to pursue pop stardom, but the Fort Worth resident says she is living her […]]]>

Yasmeen Nasir lives his life in two different worlds. During the day, she works as a project engineer for the aerospace company Lockheed Martin Corp. She is also a musician in the making.

Some may wonder how an engineer has time to pursue pop stardom, but the Fort Worth resident says she is living her dream by pursuing two things that she has been passionate about her entire life and that these interests blend together perfectly.

“I am who I am because of music, and I am who I am because I am engineering,” says Nasir. “It’s not like one or the other. It’s completely mixed up.

The singer, whose artist name is YASMEEN, will release her debut album Pure happiness October 15.

Although she is finally starting to make her name known in all caps as a musician, pursuing a musical career hasn’t always been easy for Nasir.

“I also come from a Middle Eastern background, so going into music was not something that was acceptable,” she says. “It was a bit of a taboo, really.”

As an Afghan Muslim woman, Nasir says it was difficult to pursue a career unrelated to engineering or law. Middle Eastern culture, she says, has an “old-fashioned” approach that prioritizes well-paying jobs that will ensure financial stability.

Although her father was not so involved in her life when she was growing up, Nasir says he appreciated that she was interested and involved in the arts. Her mother, meanwhile, came from a stricter background and did not approve of what she initially considered Nasir’s hobby, strongly advising her daughter to pursue a career in STEM, not in music – although she has attended all of Nasir’s concerts. .

The artist says she had to “push the envelope back” so that her mother would eventually come and fully support her. Nasir felt she needed to prove herself by taking AP courses in high school, majoring in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) degree, and becoming president of the Society of Women Engineers in college. Even now, she is enrolled in graduate school, studying engineering management.

It’s a tough career, but like music, it’s something Nasir wants to do

“I’m very passionate about women being in STEM and I was very passionate about being a part of music,” she says.

Once Nasir started to gain traction and release his own music, it was easier for his mother to see that a career in the arts could be worth it.

“Music is something that I knew would stay with me like the rest of my life,” says Nasir. “And I think now she finally understands.”

Nasir’s interest in music and singing was piqued when she was in elementary school. During a talent show in sixth grade, she realized how much she loved to act. Then came other talent shows in elementary school and the choir in high school.

When the time came to enter college, Nasir decided to major in mechanical engineering at the University of Texas-Arlington. At that time, she was not ready to pursue a career in music, but she continued to sing in a choir.

Eventually, she heard about RISE, an acapella pop group made up of college students on campus. She joined the group in the fall of 2016, and it was quickly successful.

In its first year, the organization was able to participate in the final of the A Cappella Collegiate International Championship. The competition, which is a nationally renowned event in the acapella world, was also portrayed in the comedy Perfect.

The group qualified twice for the final of the competition and Nasir served as group president from 2018 to 2020, when she graduated.

“I kept trying to have music alongside my engineering career,” she says.

By the time she graduated with her bachelor’s degree, Nasir still hadn’t really done any solo music other than the occasional solo with RISE. She started recording voice memos that she thought would make cool songs.

After graduating in May 2020, Nasir got a job at Lockheed. Although she now had a secure job in her field, she still had another dream to fulfill: to branch out as an individual artist.

“I had done so many group sets – and they were fun, don’t get me wrong – but I really enjoyed being in creative control or just having my own ideas,” she says.

In May 2020, she began writing her first single, “Pure Bliss”, before completing a handful of other songs.

“Then I didn’t really have any concrete projects, she says. Like, I knew I wanted to release music, but I didn’t know if that meant an EP, an album …”

COVID-19 was still new and growing in importance, so she worried about where she might perform or how to get her name known, but she continued to write and record more music and booked a few local gigs.

Releasing five singles during the pandemic was a difficult and far from ideal experience, Nasir says. With social distancing restrictions, she couldn’t book as many shows or collaborate with as many artists as she wanted.

Grand Prairie resident Alexis Galindo, who was a member of RISE with Nasir, says Nasir’s passion for music was undeniable from the moment she met her, but watching Nasir’s growth since 2016 has been astounding. Nasir has always had a “boisterous personality,” but had to find the confidence to present himself as a solo artist, she says.

“As a singer, she definitely got into her own groove,” says Galindo. “She knows what kind of sounds she’s looking for, but she doesn’t want to limit herself to that either.”

Now that pandemic restrictions have eased, Nasir is finally able to gain a foothold and has recently performed at several local venues.

Arlington resident Lesley Cruze, a UT-Arlington alumnus who has known Nasir from college, says Nasir has always been clearly obsessed with music – and the TV show Big time Rush, at least in college.

“Everyone knew [Nasir] love Big time Rush, it was kind of like a thing, ”says Cruze.

Growing up, Cruze said that “everyone” would tell Nasir that she should put her musical aspirations on the back burner to make STEM a priority, but Cruze would encourage Nassir to pursue his other passion.

Cruze says that Nasir’s success in engineering is a testament to his hard work and helps him stand out in the music business.

Galindo says Nasir stands out as a musician because of her joy in entertaining, her ability to get her message across to her audience and involve everyone.

“It’s the whole point of playing, like you do for yourself, but you also do it for the people you play for,” says Galindo. “You want your music translated, what you wrote it for them, and hope someone can feel what you felt when you first put that pencil on that paper.”

“Justin Timberlake was a huge influence, but I mean he’s a white man in pop – it’s not hard to find.” –Yasmeen Nasir

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With every song she writes, Nasir shows new growth and new emotion, and “Pure Bliss” will be a manifestation of the past five years of personal growth, Galindo says. The album is decidedly personal. Nasir doesn’t write music for the general public, says Galindo – she writes what she feels.

Regardless of the initial setback in his upbringing, Nasir says his nationality and heritage are major inspirations in his music.

One of the songs on her upcoming album is based on an Afghan folk song her mother used to sing to her when she was a baby. The song is a staple in Afghan culture, and Nasir says she loves the idea of ​​paying homage to her country.

Nasir wants women from under-represented ethnicities to be able to see themselves represented in pop and R&B and to know that it is possible to make a name for themselves in the genre.

“It’s definitely a big motivation why I do what I do,” says Nasir. “Not only do I love music, but it would have been great for me, at 10, to say to myself ‘Oh, that’s so cool, she looks like me, she knows what I’ve been through and she could create music like this.

Growing up, she never saw someone like her in music.

“Justin Timberlake was a huge influence, but I mean he’s a white man in pop – it’s not hard to find,” says Nasir. “You can see them and there is another like them.”

Today, Nasir’s biggest inspiration in the industry is Sno Allegra, a Persian-Swedish R&B singer and songwriter. Although not famous enough, Allegra has collaborated with artists like Tyler, The Creator and Pharell Williams, and Michael B. Jordan has appeared in her music videos.

“It’s fantastic to see someone who comes from a bit of my background and can be a bit mainstream,” says Nasir. “There isn’t much representation of Middle Eastern or Muslim artists in pop music today.”

This reality motivates her every day to become the representative she wants to see. Nasir wants to change society’s perspective on Middle Eastern women.

“Everyone thinks ‘modest, covered, uneducated, they have no rights’, blah blah blah,” says Nasir. “But no, this is not an exact representation of the Middle Eastern woman.”

People rarely think of pop stars when they think of Middle Eastern women, and Nasir hopes to be living proof that it is possible. Just as she is Middle Eastern, but also Texan. Just as she is an engineer, but also a pop artist.

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German hotel opens investigation after Jewish musician says he was discriminated against https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/german-hotel-opens-investigation-after-jewish-musician-says-he-was-discriminated-against/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/german-hotel-opens-investigation-after-jewish-musician-says-he-was-discriminated-against/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 18:29:46 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/german-hotel-opens-investigation-after-jewish-musician-says-he-was-discriminated-against/ (CNN) – A hotel in Germany has opened an investigation and suspended employees after musician Gil Ofarim, who is Jewish, alleged he was discriminated against on Monday because he was obviously wearing a Star of David necklace. In an Instagram video posted on Tuesday, Ofarim said that an employee at the Westin Hotel in Leipzig, […]]]>

(CNN) – A hotel in Germany has opened an investigation and suspended employees after musician Gil Ofarim, who is Jewish, alleged he was discriminated against on Monday because he was obviously wearing a Star of David necklace.

In an Instagram video posted on Tuesday, Ofarim said that an employee at the Westin Hotel in Leipzig, eastern Germany, allowed others to jump him in line, then told him to “pack up his star “before allowing it to register.

The Westin hotel has opened an investigation into the incident, Leipzig site general manager Andreas Hachmeister told CNN in an email.

“We are concerned about this report and take the incident very seriously,” Hachmeister said. “Our goal is to integrate, support and respect all of our customers and employees, regardless of their religion. Affected employees have been suspended and we will clarify the matter without compromise. We are a cosmopolitan and international hotel and reject any kind of discrimination. “

Ofarim manager Yvonne Probst said in a statement: “Gil was still visibly shocked today as he has to deal with yesterday’s incident in Leipzig.”

Josef Schuster, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, said on Twitter “the anti-Semitic hostility against Gil Ofarim is shocking.”

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David Arden introduced the musician at the Victorian Seniors Festival https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/david-arden-introduced-the-musician-at-the-victorian-seniors-festival/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/david-arden-introduced-the-musician-at-the-victorian-seniors-festival/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:47:29 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/david-arden-introduced-the-musician-at-the-victorian-seniors-festival/ Kokatha and Gunditjmara musician David Arden will headline the Victorian Seniors Festival. The theme of the 2021 festival is Keep’n On. It brings together a wide variety of appreciated and celebrated artists and aims to encourage a deeper understanding and appreciation of diversity among older people. “The festival is a multicultural festival for seniors and […]]]>

Kokatha and Gunditjmara musician David Arden will headline the Victorian Seniors Festival.

The theme of the 2021 festival is Keep’n On. It brings together a wide variety of appreciated and celebrated artists and aims to encourage a deeper understanding and appreciation of diversity among older people.

“The festival is a multicultural festival for seniors and the elderly,” Arden explained.

“The greatest thing about it is that you connect with your own community, but you also connect with the community at large.

“Multiculturalism is so important, we are all from here. Some of us are not First Nations people, but those who are here now make this country our country.

The festival will appear online again, having been changed to a virtual format in 2020 due to COVID-19.

The festival seeks to connect with communities and individuals who have experienced isolation due to COVID-19 lockdowns.

Arden has spent time creating and finding new ways to connect with those he loves.

“These days it’s just about trying to survive, there are a lot of setbacks but in the setbacks there are creative opportunities,” he said.

“New stories are coming and new things to write. Creating is exciting, but living can be difficult!

“My family, some of them live far away, but the key to message is now a phone!” All this technology and Facetime. You need to stay in touch this way to keep your head above water.

The festival has been redesigned this year to suit both online and radio audiences, and will see Arden perform songs from his recent release. Red Desert Man.

Red Desert Man sees Arden share the experiences of his childhood raised by four mothers and pays homage to his grandfather.

“The songs write on their own. I try to have as much power as possible to recover what assimilation has taken away, ”he said.

“Sometimes it’s about taking a step back and letting history write itself.

“I feel really good, it’s a story I wanted to share, it’s the story of my grandparents.”

Arden notes that the album also weaves his journey and that of his wife, recognizing his family and his cultural identity.

“He also talks about my wife, [she is from the] Arrest people. My Kokatha side and my wife’s side – it brings them together.

“His father was a stolen generation who was taken away from his mother, never had the chance to speak his language. He returned to his family; I wrote a song to show what it could have been if they hadn’t taken it.

With nearly four decades of experience in the Australian music scene, Arden is one of the greats.

He has worked alongside Archie Roach, Ruby Hunter, Bart Willoughby, Mixed Relations, Dan Sultan, Shane Howard, Paul Kelly, Not Drowning and Hunters and Collectors.

For Arden, telling stories through music was a natural instinct. Growing up listening to country music, Arden fell in love and spent a lot of time finding her marks and her own style.

“I grew up with country and western storytellers, you start to understand and learn this music, you fall in love with it,” he said.

“It’s an old traditional tradition for First Nations people, and it just feels right… Forty years ago, when I started, I was just trying to find out who I was.

Arden remembers his days working with No Fixed Address and the influence of rock and roll on his music.

“I remember the time with No Fixed Address they were called politicians, but the reality is life is politics,” he said.

“Music is based on life stories, and to me that’s what music is.”

The festival will see Arden perform alongside esteemed artists, musicians and playwrights.

Ian Braybrook of Castlemaine’s Radio 88 will also produce 4 radio documentaries that will feature performances and interviews with great Australian artists from the 1960s and beyond.

The Victorian Seniors Festival 2021 is an annual event funded by the Victorian government.

By Rachael Knowles

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Musicians flee Afghanistan fearing Taliban rule https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musicians-flee-afghanistan-fearing-taliban-rule/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musicians-flee-afghanistan-fearing-taliban-rule/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 01:57:36 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musicians-flee-afghanistan-fearing-taliban-rule/ More than 100 young artists, teachers and their relatives affiliated with the Afghan National Institute of Music, a famous school that has become a target of the Taliban in part for its efforts to promote girls’ education, fled the country on Sunday, the school leaders mentioned. The musicians, many of whom have been trying to […]]]>

More than 100 young artists, teachers and their relatives affiliated with the Afghan National Institute of Music, a famous school that has become a target of the Taliban in part for its efforts to promote girls’ education, fled the country on Sunday, the school leaders mentioned.

The musicians, many of whom have been trying to leave for more than a month, boarded a flight from Kabul’s main airport and arrived in Qatar’s capital Doha around noon eastern time, according to Ahmad Naser Sarmast. , School’s director. , which is currently in Australia. In the coming days, they plan to relocate to Portugal, where the government has agreed to grant them visas.

“This is already a big step and a very, very big achievement on the road to saving Afghan musicians from Taliban cruelty,” Sarmast, who opened the school in 2010, said in a statement. “You can’t imagine how happy I am.”

The musicians join a growing number of Afghans who have fled the country since August, when the Taliban consolidated their control of the country amid withdrawal of US forces. Among the figures from the arts and sports world who have escaped are members of a women’s football team which has relocated to Portugal and Italy.

Yet hundreds of the school’s students, staff and alumni remain in Afghanistan and face an uncertain future amid signs that the Taliban will work to restrict non-religious music, which they outright banned when they ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001.

Supporters of the school, a global network of artists, philanthropists, politicians and educators, plan to continue working to bring the remaining musicians out of Afghanistan. “The mission is not over,” said Mr. Sarmast, an Afghan music scholar. “It just started.”

Renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma has helped educate politicians and other artists about the plight of musicians. He said he was “shaking with excitement” by the news that some of them had escaped.

“It would be a terrible tragedy to lose this essential group of people who are so deeply motivated to make a living tradition part of the world tradition,” Ma said in a telephone interview.

Among the musicians who remain stuck in the country, he said: “I think of them every hour of the day.”

The Afghan National Institute of Music was a rarity: a mixed institution devoted to teaching Afghan and Western music, mainly to students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The school has become known for supporting the education of girls, who make up about a third of the student body. The school’s all-female orchestra, Zohra, has toured the world and been widely acclaimed, and has become a symbol of Afghanistan’s changing identity.

The school has faced threats from the Taliban for years, and in 2014 Mr. Sarmast was injured by a Taliban suicide bomber.

Since the Taliban’s return to power, the school has come under renewed scrutiny. Mr Sarmast and the school’s supporters worked for weeks to help students, alumni, staff and loved ones leave the country, fearing for their safety. The government of Qatar helped organize a safe passage for musicians in Doha and played a key role in negotiations with the Taliban.

Several students and young artists affiliated with the music institute have said in interviews with The Times in recent weeks that they have stayed at home for fear of being assaulted or punished by the Taliban. Many have stopped playing music, hid their instruments, and tried to cover up their school affiliation. They requested anonymity to comment for fear of reprisal.

In the closing days of the American war in Afghanistan, supporters of the school carried out a frantic and ultimately unsuccessful attempt to evacuate nearly 300 students, teachers and staff affiliated with the school, as well as their families. The operation was supported by prominent politicians and security officials in the United States. At one point, the musicians sat on seven buses near an airport gate for 17 hours, hoping to board a waiting plane. But the plan collapsed at the last minute when musicians were unable to access the airport and fears of a possible terrorist attack escalated.

The Taliban have tried to promote an image of tolerance and moderation since their return to power, vowing not to retaliate against their former enemies and claiming that women would be allowed to work and study “within the limits of Islamic law. “.

But they have sent signals that they will impose tough policies, including on culture. A Taliban spokesperson recently said music would not be allowed in public.

“Music is prohibited in Islam,” spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in an interview with The Times in August. “But we hope we can persuade people not to do such things, instead of pressuring them.”

John Baily, an ethnomusicologist at the University of London who has studied cultural life in Afghanistan, said it would be difficult for the Taliban to completely eradicate music in the country after years in which the arts were allowed to flourish.

“You have literally thousands of kids who have grown up with music,” he said, “and they’re not just going to be turned off like that. “

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Young Edinburgh musician talks about overcoming mental health challenges https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/young-edinburgh-musician-talks-about-overcoming-mental-health-challenges/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/young-edinburgh-musician-talks-about-overcoming-mental-health-challenges/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 06:29:38 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/young-edinburgh-musician-talks-about-overcoming-mental-health-challenges/ A Leith-born jazz trumpeter and composer spoke about his journey in the industry so far and what it took for him to release his debut album under his own name. Sean Gibbs, 28, left Leith at the age of 18 to study at the Birmingham Conservatory before moving to his current home in north London. […]]]>

A Leith-born jazz trumpeter and composer spoke about his journey in the industry so far and what it took for him to release his debut album under his own name.

Sean Gibbs, 28, left Leith at the age of 18 to study at the Birmingham Conservatory before moving to his current home in north London.

The trumpeter has released his new album “When can I see you again?” via Ubuntu Music in August earlier this year.

And to mark the occasion, Sean spoke to Edinburgh Live about how to overcome the mental health challenges associated with being a songwriter and musician, and his journey to become a trumpeter and songwriter.

He also gives advice to young Edinburgh musicians who want to break into the jazz scene.

Of the hurdles he had to overcome, he said: “Mental health can be difficult as a musician because it’s easy to equate your self-esteem with how you see yourself as ‘successful’ in music. your domain. On top of that, work-life balance can also be non-existent at times. I think as I got a little older I realized the importance of even having very small periods of time away from it all.

“But in saying that, the musician community is generally so welcoming, and it’s important to see the big picture. The euphoric effects that you can feel when things come together and you really connect with your fellow musicians and the audience, is something I wouldn’t trade for anything.

The importance of human relationships in overcoming the mental health issues of being a musician is evident when Sean discusses the inspiration behind his new album and how he composed most of the music in the “depths”. the deepest and darkest locks! “

He said: “My new album, ‘When can I see you again?’, Is largely about celebrating the human bonds that I had sometimes taken for granted, many of which were sorely missed during the pandemic.

“Musically, he is rooted in the tradition of jazz, with an emphasis on lyrical melodies, hearty grooves and a deep connection to the blues. Exciting, this is my first album which is available on vinyl, a format that I have always loved.

“I really like playing with the other four musicians on the album, so I hope I have the opportunity to play more shows with them. We had a really happy and affirming album launch in August at the Vortex Jazz Club in London, and I’m working on planning a UK tour for next May. The album was broadcast widely on the radio and was added to some important playlists, so I hope to reach new audiences.



Sean grew up in Leith before moving south to pursue his passion.

“Having written the music with the specific four players in mind, we didn’t need a lot of rehearsal time so we were able to get into the studio right away. We recorded it over two days, all in the same room without any editing. I like this way of working because you get a really honest reflection of the sound of the band and it lends itself to more real interaction between the musicians. I find that doing excessive takes / overdubbing can really take the heart of things, at least in the jazz idiom.

“The album features an array of talent, including Riley Stone-Lonergan on tenor saxophone, Rob Brockway on piano, Calum Gourlay on bass and Jay Davis on drums.”

Sean notes that his family weren’t particularly talented musically, but that his father often played a variety of genres that inspired him to pursue music from a young age.



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On how he got involved in the genre, he said: “I have always really loved music and I remember when I was young being obsessed with everything that was going on in music. car or around the house. My dad had a pretty eclectic mix of CDs and cassettes, so I was happy to listen to all kinds of stuff.

“There are no musicians in my immediate family, but hearing all the music being played was enough to motivate me at first.

“I started taking piano lessons when I was eight or nine, then started playing the trumpet in school at 11 thanks to the free brass lessons that started being offered. . I guess I adopted him quite naturally, but I certainly wasn’t a prodigy to begin with. I just loved it so I was happy to put in the hours of training.

“After I started playing the trumpet, I started paying more attention to some of the jazz albums that had jazz albums that my dad listened to at home. Lee Morgan in particular blew me away because his playing was so touching and exciting. I got totally hooked from there. The main characteristic that sets jazz apart from other genres is the emphasis on improvisation, which allows musicians’ creativity to truly shine. I am also naturally drawn to music that comes from the blues.



Sean developed an interest in music thanks to his father playing several genres during his childhood.
Sean developed an interest in music thanks to his father playing several genres during his childhood.

“When I was 16, I auditioned successfully for the Edinburgh City School of Music. I guess that’s when I made the decision to pursue my career in music. The last two years at school have helped me prepare for life in a conservatory and beyond for the profession.

After Sean discovered Lee Morgan, he began to research other jazz trumpet greats such as Miles Davis, Freddie Hubbard, Clifford Brown, and Clark Terry.

And throughout his teenage years, he says he had many inspiring teachers who helped him along the jazz path, including Gabriel Latchin, Martin Kershaw and David Patrick.

But at the same time, Sean says the experience and contacts gained playing with the Edinburgh Schools Jazz Orchestra and the Edinburgh Schools Rock Ensemble as well as the Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra (TSYJO) and the National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland ( NYJOS) were essential for making friends and meeting future collaborators.



Sean playing at a private event.
Sean playing at a private event.

He said, “NYJOS allowed me to hone my skills over a week-long course with esteemed tutors and guest soloists. TSYJO was more of a glimpse into professional life, where we had to read music at a high level and perform with very little rehearsal time. It was an invaluable baptism by fire and allowed me to meet Tommy Smith, who I now work with as a member of the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra.

On what it takes to be successful in the industry and what to expect, he said, “It mostly comes down to hard work on your instrument and your musicality in general. It takes a lot of study on the jazz lineage and also requires you to become an active member of your local scene. Going to music college can certainly be helpful, but not absolutely necessary.

“You probably don’t have to think about it too much, it’s just about being good at your craft and being easy to work with.

“I was fortunate in 2019 to perform with the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra at Bunka Kaikan in Tokyo and Lincoln Center in New York. Such experiences truly sound like a dream come true and can often make life as a musician difficult. Likewise, I have had incredibly rewarding concerts in much smaller venues. For me, the thrill mostly comes from connecting with my fellow musicians and with audiences, regardless of their size.

“We make our money mainly from ticket sales, but some of the most important jazz concerts in the UK are subsidized by public funds. Although I also teach some private students and sometimes play in more commercial settings for a living.

Sean also plays as a sideman in ensembles such as the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra, the Calum Gourlay Big Band and the Young Pilgrims.

To listen to his album, simply search for “Sean Gibbs: When I See You Again?” or follow this link.

If anyone would like to purchase a CD or vinyl, please visit: seangibbs.bandcamp.com.

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Korolenko’s 1886 novel “The Blind Musician” Still Fascinates Persian Readers https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/korolenkos-1886-novel-the-blind-musician-still-fascinates-persian-readers/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/korolenkos-1886-novel-the-blind-musician-still-fascinates-persian-readers/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 15:05:19 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/korolenkos-1886-novel-the-blind-musician-still-fascinates-persian-readers/ TEHRAN – The seventh edition of the Persian translation of the 1886 novel by Ukrainian writer Vladimir Korolenko “The Blind Musician” has been published. Published by Elmi Farhangi Publishing House, the book was translated into Persian by Jahangir Afkari. The first edition of the Persian translation was published in 1967. The book is a psychological […]]]>

TEHRAN – The seventh edition of the Persian translation of the 1886 novel by Ukrainian writer Vladimir Korolenko “The Blind Musician” has been published.

Published by Elmi Farhangi Publishing House, the book was translated into Persian by Jahangir Afkari. The first edition of the Persian translation was published in 1967.

The book is a psychological study, in which the inner life of the blind is analyzed, in view of their trials resulting from their lack of sight.

The subjects of the study are a blind girl whom the author knew as a child; a boy, a pupil who was gradually losing his sight; and a professional musician, blind from birth, of superior intelligence, erudition and refinement.

Anagnos, director of the Massachusetts School for the Blind, who, after having praised its literary and artistic merits, declares it faithful to the conditions for the intellectual and physical development of this class of unfortunate people.

Arguably his most acclaimed and well-known work, “The Blind Musician” aroused controversy in its time and was the subject of severe criticism from the private professor at Moscow University, AM Shcherbina, who had lost sight at the age of two and considered Korolenko’s theories about the blind. people’s “intrinsic desire for light” is totally unfounded.

“Creating an honorable treatise on the psychology of the blind has never been my goal,” Korolenko explained in a letter to Arkady Gornfeld on January 10, 1917.

“Rather, the idea was to take a closer look at man’s desire for all things unattainable, for that ever-lacking fullness of life,” he writes.

Originally serialized on February 2 and April 13, 1886 by Russkiye Vedomosti, the novel subsequently appeared in a significantly edited version in the July 1886 issue of Russkaya Mysl and a year later was released as a separate edition, again revised by the ‘author.

Korolenko did not stop editing the text until after the release of the sixth edition of the book in 1898.

Photo: Cover of the Persian translation of Vladimir Korolenko’s novel “The Blind Musician”.

MMS / YAW

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“We really didn’t see that we had a choice”: San Antonio Symphony musicians on strike after negotiations stammer https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/we-really-didnt-see-that-we-had-a-choice-san-antonio-symphony-musicians-on-strike-after-negotiations-stammer/ https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/we-really-didnt-see-that-we-had-a-choice-san-antonio-symphony-musicians-on-strike-after-negotiations-stammer/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 23:49:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/we-really-didnt-see-that-we-had-a-choice-san-antonio-symphony-musicians-on-strike-after-negotiations-stammer/ The move comes after the symphony orchestra’s board of directors voted to force a previously rejected offer. SAN ANTONIO – The union representing the musicians of the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra has declared a strike after the symphony orchestra declared a stalemate during negotiations. At the start of the pandemic, the musicians of the San […]]]>

The move comes after the symphony orchestra’s board of directors voted to force a previously rejected offer.

SAN ANTONIO – The union representing the musicians of the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra has declared a strike after the symphony orchestra declared a stalemate during negotiations.

At the start of the pandemic, the musicians of the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra adapted by creating a virtual symphonic performance. One of the other ways they adjusted was to contact the San Antonio Symphony Society and offer to reopen their contract.

“The musicians have voluntarily agreed to take an 80 percent pay cut – that’s eight to zero – percent over the past season in order to keep the San Antonio Symphony together and on stage during the pandemic” , said Mary Ellen Goree.

Goree has played classical music for most of his life.

“Well, I fell in love with orchestral music when I was maybe 11,” Goree said.

It was a long road from his hometown of Ottawa, Kansas, to becoming the second principal violin of the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra. She studied, lived and worked in places like Indiana, Louisiana and even Japan.

“It has become more and more clear to me that this is what I need to do,” she said. “That’s what I’m here for.”

Among her colleagues, whom she represents as chair of the musicians’ negotiating committee, her story is not unique.

“Our auditions are not local auditions, they are advertised nationally and people come from all over the place.”

This thought worries him about the draft contract that the symphony is offering to its musicians.

The San Antonio Symphony employs 72 full-time musicians. After months of negotiations, the symphony presented what it called its latest best offer which would reduce the size of the symphony to 42 full-time musicians with a contingent of 26 part-time musicians.

“The symphony orchestra’s board of directors is committed to living within its means,” said Corey Cowart, executive director of the San Antonio Symphony. “We have to accept budgets that are always ambitious, but, more importantly, achievable.”

The musicians’ union rejected the offer.

“That’s not what people auditioned for, that’s not what people accepted, that’s not why people moved here,” Goree said. “And so I would be very surprised if a lot of people didn’t go, I mean basically anyone who could go would go.”

“We’re always worried about losing people,” Cowart said. “This must be a concern for any orchestra.”

Cowart said that although negotiations have taken place because of the pandemic, the offer is part of a long-term goal of the board of directors to make the organization more sustainable. He said they had an operating budget of around $ 8 million in a normal year, but ticket sales only brought in just under $ 3 million.

“At the end of the day, there is no way to artistic excellence, or no path to artistic excellence, if we don’t have a viable organization,” said Cowart.

The San Antonio Symphony’s board of directors voted to declare a deadlock, forcing their latest best offer. The San Antonio Musicians’ Society responded by calling a strike.

“These terms will be the destruction of the San Antonio Symphony, and the musicians will not be complicit in the destruction of the San Antonio Symphony,” Goree said. “So we really didn’t see that we had a choice. “

Cowart said no shows have been delayed or canceled yet, but it’s something they may have to consider if a deal isn’t struck for a long time.

“We have to come to a mutual agreement with the local union and with our musicians to get them back on stage,” he said. “We can’t play without them.

Goree pointed out that the quality of life offered by a full symphony is one way of attracting business to San Antonio. But in the end, it’s other 11-year-old girls – as she once was – who worry her.

“I talk to members of the audience and there is always at least one from a middle school or high school orchestra who is there in class with his teacher. And they are so excited to talk to me, ask questions and take their picture with me, ”she said. “All of this is in danger of being lost.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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