Natural history – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:42:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Natural history – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ 32 32 The Duchess of Cambridge, the reliable royal, turns 40 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-duchess-of-cambridge-the-reliable-royal-turns-40/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:42:30 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-duchess-of-cambridge-the-reliable-royal-turns-40/ By DANICA KIRKA LONDON (AP) – At least there’s Kate. The Duchess of Cambridge, who turns 40 on Sunday, has become the reliable British royal. After Prince Harry and Meghan’s stormy departure to California in 2020, Prince Philip’s death last year and now allegations of sexual abuse against Prince Andrew, the former Kate Middleton remains […]]]>

By DANICA KIRKA

LONDON (AP) – At least there’s Kate.

The Duchess of Cambridge, who turns 40 on Sunday, has become the reliable British royal.

After Prince Harry and Meghan’s stormy departure to California in 2020, Prince Philip’s death last year and now allegations of sexual abuse against Prince Andrew, the former Kate Middleton remains in the public eye as smiling mother of three who can comfort grieving parents at a children’s hospice or wow the nation by playing the piano at a televised Christmas concert.

“This is the woman who was the commoner who got married into the royal family and who didn’t stumble, caused no embarrassment,” Katie Nicholl, author of “Kate: The Future Queen”. “It hasn’t been an easy year, and yet Kate seems to be a bit of a beacon in it all.”

At a time when the House of Windsor faces more than its fair share of controversy, Prince William’s wife has been recognized for her commitment to early education, art and music. The charities she supports spring from her willingness to get personally involved in their causes.

Olivia Marks-Woldman was touched by Kate’s care in photographing Holocaust survivors Steven Frank and Yvonne Bernstein for an exhibit sponsored by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust. Before the shoot, the Duchess spent time learning the stories of her subjects and used that knowledge to compose the photos, said Marks-Woldman, CEO of the trust.

“It was a very involved and thoughtful participation,” she recalls. “But even after these photographs were taken the Duchess supported the project and supported Steven and Yvonne and took an interest in them and sent them Christmas cards, recently invited them to the Abbey carol service from Westminster and it is just wonderful. “

Tracy Rennie, deputy CEO of East Anglia Children’s Hospices, has a similar account of when Kate visited one of the organization’s facilities in 2019. The Duchess agreed to speak with parents and others relatives of a recently deceased child because they wanted to meet her, even though their pain was still acute.

“It was actually a very encouraging conversation, to the point that we were laughing and joking together as a family before we left – you wouldn’t imagine this in such a difficult situation,” said Rennie. “They felt absolutely honored that she took the time to quit and were overwhelmed by the fact that she was a ‘normal person’ – their words, not mine. They felt she was doing it. really cared.

Kate is royal by choice, not by birth.

The daughter of an air hostess and a flight dispatcher, Catherine Elizabeth Middleton was born in Reading, England on January 9, 1982, and raised with a younger sister, Pippa, and a younger brother, James.

The Middletons, from an affluent area of ​​Berkshire, west London, moved to Jordan when Kate was 2 because of her father’s job. They returned to England in 1986 and Kate attended the very exclusive Marlborough College, where she played sports such as hockey, tennis and netball.

It was at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland that Kate first met Prince William, the eldest son of the late Princess Diana and the second heir to the British throne after her father, Prince Charles.

First friends, then roommates with two other students, William and Kate bonded romantically around 2004, when they were photographed together on a ski trip in Switzerland. Kate graduated in 2005 with a degree in art history and an emerging relationship with the prince.

William complained about the press intrusion, and Kate’s lawyers have asked newspaper editors to leave her alone. Regardless, the UK media followed every twist in their relationship, including a brief break-up in 2007. William later admitted that the couple’s romance had faltered for several months, claiming that they were both young and trying to find their way.

The tabloids nicknamed her “Waity Katie” for her patience during their courtship display. The couple finally got married at Westminster Abbey in 2011. They have three children.

For 11 years under the royal microscope, Kate largely avoided criticism by adopting the royal maxim “never complain, never explain”.

This was evident last year when Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, claimed in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that Kate had made her cry during a disagreement over bridesmaid dresses as she approached her wedding. Meghan and Harry in 2019. Kate and the Palace responded with silence.

Yet Kate still has the ability to surprise.

For a Christmas carol concert at Westminster Abbey, she sat at a piano and accompanied Scottish singer Tom Walker on “For They Who Can’t Be Here,” a song inspired by loss and loss. separation during the pandemic.

While it was no secret that Kate had studied the instrument, the prerecorded performance at a nationally televised concert was something entirely new. Walker said he wasn’t sure what to expect when the palace suggested the Duchess could accompany him to perform the new song at the event.

“It was essentially, for the Duchess, a giant bet,” Walker told the AP. “It’s really jumping in the deep end and just hoping you can swim. Because I would have my own reservations about going to a venue and playing with someone else’s band on a song I hadn’t written and doing it with absolute grace. It’s not an easy thing, so it must have been quite a challenge.

Biographer Nicholl, who has watched Kate for years, said the performance offered a glimpse into Kate’s character, describing her as brave and confident – a person who is aware of her strengths.

With Queen Elizabeth II preparing to celebrate 70 years on the throne later this year and the focus on the longevity of the monarchy, Kate’s place as the wife of one future king and mother of another will be even bigger.

“I think the monarchy is in good hands,” Nicholl said.



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Fargo-Moorhead Science Museum to Receive $ 1.2 Million in Donations to Advance Efforts – InForum https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/fargo-moorhead-science-museum-to-receive-1-2-million-in-donations-to-advance-efforts-inforum/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 23:27:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/fargo-moorhead-science-museum-to-receive-1-2-million-in-donations-to-advance-efforts-inforum/ FARGO – A private local organization donated $ 225,000 to the Fargo-Moorhead Science Museum’s effort, which was the first big boost in its efforts to develop the facility. The organization wanted to remain anonymous, but FMSM’s board chairman Ken Brazerol said the funds will allow the project to begin the search for an executive director […]]]>

FARGO – A private local organization donated $ 225,000 to the Fargo-Moorhead Science Museum’s effort, which was the first big boost in its efforts to develop the facility.

The organization wanted to remain anonymous, but FMSM’s board chairman Ken Brazerol said the funds will allow the project to begin the search for an executive director and kick off the planning phase of a campaign. fundraising to develop the facility.

On top of that, he said the group plans to announce an even bigger giveaway of $ 1 million next week that will help push the effort further forward. He said the name of this donor will be public.

Brazerol, who works for the digital mapping company called Here Technologies of Chicago, said the executive director will provide day-to-day leadership and coordination as planning progresses.

The group is also focusing on raising even more funds for the museum and choosing a location.

Brazerol said they have had “great conversations” with the cities about possible locations.

Options include retrofitting an existing building or designing and constructing a new structure. The group is working with JLG Architects on a site survey because they said they want to “get it right the first time.”

The museum would be a place for children and adults to explore and engage in science, technology, engineering, and math, collectively known as STEM. The aim is to present interactive exhibitions and programs that promote scientific culture.

Topics covered would examine the region’s natural history, from Ice Age fossils at glacial Lake Agassiz to the soils of the Red River Valley. A mobile outreach unit or classroom is also a hope of the group.

“I think this museum will be a great addition to the community,” said Brazerol.

“It will be a great place for families in the winter,” he said as temperatures were well below zero last week.

The FMSM’s board of directors, besides Brazerol, includes several instructors from North Dakota State University who Brazerol says will bring “real expertise” to the operation. These include Museum Founder, Past Chair and Geology Lecturer Jessie Rock, Chair of the Department of Geosciences and Associate Professor Stephanie Day and Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Director of the STEM Education Doctorate Jenni Momsen.

Other members of the board are Butler Machinery Co. Marketing Director Jodi Phillips, New Leaf Hospitality Director Bobbi Bricker, and Wheeler McCartney Real Estate Law Firm Director Gwen McCartney.


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A potpourri of 2021 natural history goodies https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/a-potpourri-of-2021-natural-history-goodies/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 23:06:31 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/a-potpourri-of-2021-natural-history-goodies/ Ken Baker, Ph.D. According to my writing partner, Dictionary.com, one definition of medley is “any mixture, especially of unrelated objects, subjects, etc.” So a potpourri, today, of natural history goodies from 2021. Just a few new research junk that caught my eye over the year and that I thought I’d share. . Beginning with kleptotrichi […]]]>

Ken Baker, Ph.D.

According to my writing partner, Dictionary.com, one definition of medley is “any mixture, especially of unrelated objects, subjects, etc.”

So a potpourri, today, of natural history goodies from 2021. Just a few new research junk that caught my eye over the year and that I thought I’d share. .

Beginning with kleptotrichi – from the Greek “klepto” for stealing, and “trich” for hair. Many birds weave pieces of animal hair into the lining of their nests, apparently to help cushion and insulate their eggs and nestlings.

It turns out that at least some birds (a common bird in our region is the crested tit) brazenly steal tufts of hair from living mammals. Take a look at the incredible Mark Hauber video from the Univ. from Illinois to Urbana-Champaign captured of a crested tit pulling the hair of a sleeping gray fox. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqjidqAmWpE)

Red-tailed hawks:Ken Baker: The Red-tailed Hawk adapts to almost any habitat

Female gypsy.

Not to be outdone in the weirdness, Swedish geneticist Leif Andersson has reported a mutation in a gene (known as RORB) in a breed of domestic rabbit that appears to trigger a behavioral quirk that sends the rabbit into a pear tree when pressed.

The idea is that the mutated gene interferes with the animal’s ability to coordinate its hind and front legs to jump, so it walks on its front legs instead. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-5c9AyjJx0)


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Utah National Parks, Ski Resorts: What Are the Health Benefits of Being in Nature? https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/utah-national-parks-ski-resorts-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-being-in-nature/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 04:58:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/utah-national-parks-ski-resorts-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-being-in-nature/ Nature abounds in Utah. We pride ourselves on having “The Biggest Snow on Earth”, sharing our five beautiful national parks, enjoying mountain biking trails just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City and being proud of our museum. world-class natural history. The largest living tree – named Pando – has a home in the center of […]]]>

Nature abounds in Utah. We pride ourselves on having “The Biggest Snow on Earth”, sharing our five beautiful national parks, enjoying mountain biking trails just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City and being proud of our museum. world-class natural history. The largest living tree – named Pando – has a home in the center of our state, and the gold and purples of aspen foliage adorn our foothills. We all need access to nature.

Many Utahns recognize the many benefits of nature and participate in efforts to understand, enjoy and protect it. Under the conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly 60% of Utahns surveyed said they had visited Utah’s outdoor spaces, the Tracy Aviary, and our many pocket parks.

Our spiritual leaders understand the vital connections between nature and people. The Temple Square Tabernacle Choir frequently sings songs that celebrate nature, and our pioneers promoted the sustainability of water, soils and other natural resources. The Salt Lake City Library has created a seed conservation project, which strengthens the links between people, healthy food, and home gardens. The Episcopal Cathedral of Saint Mark has installed solar panels to reduce its carbon footprint. The first Unitarian church provided a demonstration garden on its grounds.

The interweaving of nature and people also stimulates our economy. A 2021 study by the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah showed that Utah’s outdoor activities are essential for the tech industry to recruit and retain employees. Over 80% of respondents said access to wilderness and outdoor recreation was the most important factor in choosing to stay here.

Being close to nature provides the people of Utah with benefits for physical, mental and emotional well-being. Interactions with nature of all types – wilderness expeditions, nature sights, and even the sounds and smells of nature – can speed healing from physical trauma, calm our spirits, reduce anxiety, increase our ability to learn and retain knowledge, and restore a sense of balance in our busy lives.

Trees in urban spaces help cool “urban heat islands” by reducing energy demand and lowering emissions. Groups such as The Nature Conservancy, Sageland Collaborative and Tree Utah are raising awareness and providing access to nature from all angles.

But is access to the benefits of nature for human health accessible to all Utahns? The answer is no, or at least not yet. An American Forests study of other U.S. cities documented a disturbing pattern of uneven distribution of trees and other green space that has deprived less privileged people of the health benefits that the presence of natural elements can bring.

Access to the health benefits of nature may depend on those with the physical, cultural and financial capacity to do so. Mountain bikes, ski passes, and national park entrance fees are beyond the means of many who live here. Many of our science education sites strive to increase a sense of belonging for all, but past practices reinforce the sense of exclusion among low-income and underserved populations; long-standing stereotypes that are difficult to overcome.

Arches National Park is pictured on Saturday April 17, 2021.
Annie Barker, Deseret News

In 2019, a group of people from many sectors of society formed “Nature and Human Health-Utah”. Its mission is to raise awareness of the health benefits of nature, to take action to protect nature and to improve accessibility to nature for all Utahns. These efforts are modeled after a group at the University of Washington, which, recognizing that experts concerned with nature and human health tend to circulate in their own professional and disciplinary spheres, created opportunities for exchange between representatives. from various professional backgrounds.

Our group in Utah currently has over 100 individuals whose interests and backgrounds include academic science, natural history, recreation, psychology, spirituality, mental and physical health, and gardening. During the pandemic, we met virtually and now we meet in safe spaces to implement our plans. In 2021, a philanthropist provided support to coordinate these efforts and support pilot projects and annual conferences focusing on the critical links between nature and human health.

In these times, when the health of humans and nature is threatened, all people in Utah must help foster synergistic ways to keep the bonds between us strong and sustained. Visit our website – natureandhealthutah.org – to learn more – and to join us in these efforts.

Information about NHH-UT from @theU: attheu.utah.edu/announcements/new-research-practice-collaborative-group-explores-connection-between-nature-and-health.

NOTalini Nadkarni is Professor Emeritus in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Utah and studies the ecology and conservation of tropical forests in Costa Rica, Washington State and Utah.

Tim Brown is President and CEO of Tracy Aviary.

Dorothy (Dart) Schmalz is Associate Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism at the University of Utah. She studies social stigma and prejudice as they affect health behavior and treatment, as well as the interconnections between leisure, nature and well-being.


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Musfur chasm: the chasm in the desert of Qatar https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musfur-chasm-the-chasm-in-the-desert-of-qatar/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 15:00:29 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/musfur-chasm-the-chasm-in-the-desert-of-qatar/ (CNN) – Right in the middle of the Qatari Peninsula, a large chasm suddenly opens into the rocky desert, plunging about 100 meters into the ground. It’s an awesome sight whether you’re standing upstairs or downstairs. This is Musfur, a massive ancient cave believed to be the deepest accessible sinkhole ever discovered in Qatar. The […]]]>

(CNN) – Right in the middle of the Qatari Peninsula, a large chasm suddenly opens into the rocky desert, plunging about 100 meters into the ground.

It’s an awesome sight whether you’re standing upstairs or downstairs.

This is Musfur, a massive ancient cave believed to be the deepest accessible sinkhole ever discovered in Qatar.

The site is located less than an hour’s drive west of Doha, just off the main road to Salwa, making it an ideal destination for a quick and easy exit for anyone wishing to explore the underground.

The Musfur sinkhole is said to be a glimpse of the region’s geological formation.

Dimitris Sideridis

The entrance to Musfur is closed by a protective fence. Reaching the sandy depths of the chasm is relatively easy, but visitors should be vigilant as they hurtle down the steep and rugged passage. Hiking shoes are essential, but be very careful not to step on the bugs that crawl through the rocks.

The light from the entrance gradually fades as you descend to the bottom, while a pleasant breeze passes through the layers of limestone and gypsum.

While plant life is largely absent, you will come across small birds that have built their nests high on rock crevices.

Karst creations

Musfur is Qatar's largest sinkhole.

Musfur is Qatar’s largest sinkhole.

Dimitris Sideridis

The sinkholes are a typical feature of the karst topography.

This distinctive environment is the product of slightly acidic water acting on soluble bedrock such as limestone. As the water seeps into the rock, it gradually deteriorates, forming openings. Over time, these cavities fill with sand and soil. When they get big enough and the arch opening collapses, a chasm forms.

Besides sinkholes, Qatar’s karst landforms include depressions, caves, dissolution hollows, and rawdahs (gardens, meadows, or fertile depressions in Arabic).

According to geologists Abdulali M. Sadiq and Sobhi J. Nasir, writing in the Journal of Cave and Karst Studies: “Most of the karsts in central Qatar were formed due to extensive underground dissolution of carbonate and sulphate deposits. under the Middle Pleistocene. [325,000-560,000 years ago] humid climatic conditions and consequent subsidence. “

Snapshot of the past

Birds can often be seen in the rugged sinkhole.

Birds can often be seen in the rugged sinkhole.

Dimitris Sideridis

Aspa D. Chatziefthimiou, senior environmentalist and discussion coordinator at the Qatar Natural History Group, who has visited Musfur several times over the past decade, said descending into the chasm opens a window to the distant past.

“If you know how karst is formed, it’s like going back in geological time; seeing right now how water was circulating and making holes in the bedrock,” she told CNN.

“You get a snapshot – and it happens [often] in Qatar, the journey through geological time. “

To get to Musfur from Doha, head south on Salwa Road to the Mekaines exit. From there it is off-road so it is recommended to use a map app and an all-terrain vehicle as the drive on the bumpy road is bumpy. A headlamp and water are essential, as is, of course, bringing the garbage home.


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Citizen Scientists Find Young-Jupiter-Like Object https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/citizen-scientists-find-young-jupiter-like-object/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 16:06:19 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/citizen-scientists-find-young-jupiter-like-object/ Citizen scientists have discovered a new object orbiting a Sun-like star that had been missed by previous research. The object is very far from its host star – over 1,600 times farther than Earth from the Sun – and it is believed to be a large planet or small brown dwarf, a type of object […]]]>

Citizen scientists have discovered a new object orbiting a Sun-like star that had been missed by previous research. The object is very far from its host star – over 1,600 times farther than Earth from the Sun – and it is believed to be a large planet or small brown dwarf, a type of object that is not massive enough to burn hydrogen like real stars. New World Details are published today in The Journal of Astrophysics.

“This star had been examined by more than one campaign in search of fellow exoplanets. But the previous teams seemed really close, really close to the star, ”said lead author Jackie Faherty, senior scientist in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History and co-founder of the Backyard Worlds citizen science project. : Planet 9, which led to the discovery of the object. “Because the Citizen Scientists really liked the project, they found an object that many of these direct imaging surveys would have liked to find, but they didn’t look far enough from its host. “

The Backyard Worlds project allows volunteers to travel nearly five years of digital images taken by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission to try and identify new worlds inside and out. of our solar system. If an object close to Earth is moving, it will appear to “jump” in the same part of the sky over the years as a “moving” object in a flip-book. Users can then flag these objects for further study by scientists.

In 2018, Backyard Worlds participant Jörg Schümann, who lives in Germany, alerted scientists to a new co-moving system: an object that seemed to move with a star. After confirming the movement of the system, the scientists used telescopes in California and Hawaii to observe the star and the object separately and were immediately excited by what they saw.

The new object is young and has a low mass, between 10 and 20 times the mass of Jupiter. This range straddles a large cutoff point – 13 times the mass of Jupiter – which is sometimes used to distinguish planets from brown dwarfs. But scientists still don’t know how heavy the planets can be, which can make it hard to trust this cutoff. “We don’t have a very good definition of the word ‘planet’,” Faherty said.

Another defining characteristic is the way they are formed: planets form from the collection of matter in discs around stars, while brown dwarfs are born from the collapse of giant clouds of gas, in the same way that stars are formed. But the physical properties of this new object do not provide any clue as to its formation. “There are hints that it may be more like an exoplanet, but there is nothing conclusive yet. However, that’s an outlier, ”Faherty said.

What surprised the team the most was the new object’s relationship to its host star. The object is farther from the star than expected based on its relatively low mass, more than 1,600 times farther than Earth from the Sun. Few objects with masses so different from their host star have been found so far apart.

Ultimately, this discovery could help scientists better understand how solar systems are formed, which is crucial for understanding the origins of life in the universe. “You had a community of exoplanets watching it so closely,” Faherty said. “And we just pulled back a little bit, and we found an object. It makes me excited about what we might be missing in the giant planets that might exist around these stars, ”Faherty said. “Sometimes you have to broaden your scope.”

Other authors of the study include Johanna M. Vos, Daniella C. Bardalez Gagliuffi, Austin Rothermich, and Andrew Ayala of the American Museum of Natural History; Jonathan Gagné from the University of Montreal; Mark Popinchalk of the American Museum of Natural History and the University of the City of New York; Adam J. Burgasser, Christian Aganze, Chih-Chun Hsu, Roman Gerasimov, and Christopher A. Theissen of the University of California, San Diego; Adam C. Schneider of the US Naval Observatory and George Mason University; J. Davy Kirkpatrick and Federico Marocco of the California Institute of Technology; Aaron M. Meisner of the NSF National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory; Marc J. Kuchner of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center; Dan Caselden of Gigamon Applied Threat Research; Eileen C. Gonzales of Cornell University; Sarah L. Casewell of the University of Leicester; John H. Debes of the Space Telescope Science Institute; William J. Cooper of the University of Hertfordshire and the National Institute of Astrophysics in Italy, and RL Smart of the National Institute of Astrophysics in Italy.

This research was funded in part by NASA Astrophysical Data Analysis Program grant NNH17AE75I and 80NSSC20K0452, as well as NASA grant 2017-ADAP17-0067, grant # 2007068, 2009136 and 2009177 of the National Science Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

– This press release was provided by the American Museum of Natural History


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WOYM: The link between natural sources and health has ancient roots | Story https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/woym-the-link-between-natural-sources-and-health-has-ancient-roots-story/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/woym-the-link-between-natural-sources-and-health-has-ancient-roots-story/ Ray Cox Special at the Roanoke Times The water of love at the bottom of the earth But there is no water here to find Water has often flowed through the stories found here. More recently, the subject has surfaced in a series of reviews of the significance and lost culture surrounding the long-extinct (mostly) […]]]>

Ray Cox Special at the Roanoke Times

The water of love at the bottom of the earth

But there is no water here to find

Water has often flowed through the stories found here.

More recently, the subject has surfaced in a series of reviews of the significance and lost culture surrounding the long-extinct (mostly) resorts once associated with the region’s mineral springs.

Part of this untold story was the sources’ long history as health and recreation centers dating back to ancient times. One of these very important geysers was located in what is today the city of Aachen in western Germany.

The location, known to the French as Aix-La-Chapelle, was popular for its thermal springs since the days of the bath-loving Romans, when Gaul (France) was part of their Empire.

Aix-La-Chappelle later reached imminence when it was chosen by Charles the Great as its seat as King of the Franks and ultimately Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Charlemagne, as Charles is known to English speakers, chose the location for various reasons which we will return to.

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Let us first recall that by ambition and force of arms, Charlemagne (748-814) united most of what is today Western Europe – France, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, parts of Switzerland, Spain and Italy included – under one banner. Reigning as a Christian monarch, he ensured that the religion spread widely in once reluctant regions which had known only paganism.

Say it for him too, unlike the heartbroken lover in Dire Straits’ metaphor, he always knew where to find water let alone love.

Although himself almost illiterate early in his life, Charlemagne as king championed learning, the arts, sciences and music. He was the most devoted father to the many children he had fathered with three wives and an assortment of concubines, loving his beautiful daughters so much that he forbade them to marry, but was tender-hearted towards their illicit romances and their illegitimate offspring. The children accompanied him everywhere, even in the countryside, the boys by his side.

King Einhard’s biographer, who knew him as a friend and a benefactor, tells us that Charlemagne was “by nature the most ready to make friendships.” Another historian, the monk of St. Gallen Notker Balbulus (“the stutterer”) called Charlemagne “the sweetest of men”.

The good humor of the king had its limits, especially when it came to the North Saxons, a Germanic people described by Einhard as “a fierce people, given to the worship of demons, and hostile to our religion” who also “did not consider not it is dishonorable to transgress and violate all laws, human and divine.

Reluctant converted Christians and frequent invaders of these Saxons (the war lasted 33 years), the exasperated king ordered after an attack that all barbarian boys and children be “measured with a sword” and those taller than the weapon should be ” shortcuts of a head ”, in the words of the Stutterer.

On other occasions, when barbarians refused Christian conversion, the king acted quickly. Einhard wrote that in such dealings with the pagans, the king “never allowed their unfaithful behavior to go unpunished”. Charlemagne has already had 4,500 stubbornly unreliable pagans rounded up and beheaded in a day’s work.

Citing contemporary primary documents, Norman P. Zacour wrote that following this exercise in law and royal order “the king went to a winter camp… and celebrated Christmas and Easter there as usual. “.

Although Charlemagne’s armies were almost constantly at war with various Danes, Basques, Moors, Lombards, Visigoths and Huns and the king often led these missions, he knew how to have fun in peace.

Which brings us back to the sources and the choice of Charlemagne of Aix-La-Chapelle as the seat of his empire and the site of his greatest public work, the magnificent cathedral designed by the architect Eudes de Metz and completed in 798.

The king was athletic, a rider and a sportsman who was fond of hunting. Standing taller than most of his contemporaries, he was strong, with fair hair, shining eyes and a thick neck with a face that Einhard described as “laughing and happy.” The king had a kind of guts on him but it was not particularly unattractive because it was proportional to the rest of his body. The royal nose was on the long side.

Despite being a predominantly temperate man who scorned drunkenness, the king argued and ultimately ignored the doctors who implored him to forgo roast meats because boiled was a healthier preparation. At the camp, the king continues to insist on being served directly on the spit.

In addition to the rigors of hunting and vigorous warfare, the king exercised in the pool and “often practiced swimming, in which he was so skilled that no one could surpass him; and it was from there that he built his palace at Aixla-Chapelle, and lived there constantly during his last years until his death.

In the palace complex, the springs and swimming pool were part of a 50-acre lot dedicated to their use. Charlemagne “would invite not only his sons to his bath, but his nobles and friends, and from time to time a troop of his retinue or bodyguard, so that a hundred or more people sometimes bathed with him”.

Scholars have long wondered whether the king realized he was going to be crowned the first Holy Roman Emperor when he was summoned by Pope Leo III to Rome. The Pope was in trouble locally after being accused of various immoralities and at one point his enemies gouged out his eyes and cut off his tongue. The holy man asked the king for protection.

The king spent this winter in Rome “to put order in the affairs of the Church, which were in great confusion”. When the Blind Lion crowned him emperor, Einhard indicated that the king was initially reluctant to participate in the ceremony, his motives being unexplained. There was nothing to explain as to the significance of the date of this event.

It was Christmas Day 800.

If you are wondering about something, call out “What’s on your mind?” At 777-6476 or email whatsonyourmind@roanoke.com. Remember to provide your full name (and its correct spelling if by phone) and your hometown.


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Synchronized bird count to begin January 22 as migratory bird arrival peaks – The New Indian Express https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/synchronized-bird-count-to-begin-january-22-as-migratory-bird-arrival-peaks-the-new-indian-express/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 01:08:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/synchronized-bird-count-to-begin-january-22-as-migratory-bird-arrival-peaks-the-new-indian-express/ Express news service CHENNAI: As the annual migration of Arctic birds begins to Point Calimere Wildlife and Bird Sanctuary at Kodiyakarai in Nagapattinam, the state forestry department has scheduled its annual synchronized bird census on January 22 and 23. Shorebird lakhs have already flocked to the area and the size of the congregation, which field […]]]>

Express news service

CHENNAI: As the annual migration of Arctic birds begins to Point Calimere Wildlife and Bird Sanctuary at Kodiyakarai in Nagapattinam, the state forestry department has scheduled its annual synchronized bird census on January 22 and 23. Shorebird lakhs have already flocked to the area and the size of the congregation, which field observers say ranges up to 4-5 km, is much larger than in previous years.

Chief Wildlife Custodian Shekar Kumar Niraj said: “Usually the census is taken in February. But this time around, we’ve decided to move it forward until January of last week, when bird numbers are expected to peak. The census will be carried out simultaneously in the 16 bird sanctuaries, marshes and other important wetlands of Tamil Nadu. The objective is to assess the diversity of species and the population of migratory birds.

A webinar involving the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) and the Salim Ali Center for Ornithology and Natural History and Wildlife Institute of India will be held prior to the bird assessment, to discuss the methodology and techniques to be adopted in the exercise. “All census results will be sent to Wildlife Warden, Nagapattinam for compilation and analysis. They will prepare a consolidated bird estimate report and submit it to me by February 10,” Niraj said.

Bivash Pandav, director of the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), told TNIE it would be too early to draw any conclusions about the migratory bird population, but stressed that good congregations were seen at Point Calimere, all this thanks to a good monsoon.

S Balachandran, deputy director of the BNHS Regional Migration Study Center in Kodiyakarai, said the last week of January was the perfect time to take the census. “About 3-4 lakh shorebirds congregate in November last week and December the first week. This year things look very bright and the conditions are perfect for the birds to stay longer than usual. Thousands of terns and gulls, small sandpipers, sandpipers and ring-necked turnstones have been seen wading in shallow water, ”he said.

Full article on www.newandianexpress.com


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UK Covid live: Ministers ‘take a close look at the data’ before deciding on circuit breaker for England, Minister says | Politics https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/uk-covid-live-ministers-take-a-close-look-at-the-data-before-deciding-on-circuit-breaker-for-england-minister-says-politics/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 13:28:14 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/uk-covid-live-ministers-take-a-close-look-at-the-data-before-deciding-on-circuit-breaker-for-england-minister-says-politics/ What new measures are planned in England? The Prime Minister is considering three options to curb the spread of Omicron. The least restrictive would be to ask the public to limit social diversity, without legal application. This would bring England into line with the measures in place in Scotland, where people have been advised to […]]]>

What new measures are planned in England?

The Prime Minister is considering three options to curb the spread of Omicron. The least restrictive would be to ask the public to limit social diversity, without legal application. This would bring England into line with the measures in place in Scotland, where people have been advised to reduce their socialization and limit gatherings to three households.

A step forward would be mandatory restrictions on household mixing, the return of social distancing and forcing pubs and restaurants to close at 8 p.m. The third option is a return to full lockdown, or something like that, with a two week “breaker” that would be on the cards. Boris Johnson said on Friday he was not “shutting things down” but mounting pressure on the NHS could prompt rethinking.

Given Omicron’s transmissibility, would a social distance of 2 meters make a difference?

Although Omicron appears to be more transmissible than previous variants, the basic mechanisms of transmission likely remain the same – the virus is emitted in aerosols and droplets from breathing, speaking, singing, coughing, and sneezing.

Cath Noakes, member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) and professor of environmental engineering for buildings at the University of Leeds, said: “We don’t yet know if people with Omicron are emitting more viruses. or if the balance of transmission close to air at a longer distance has changed. But regardless, the concentration of aerosols and droplets is always greater at a closer distance and, therefore, physical distance remains an important measure.

“However, we know from experience throughout the pandemic – not just Omicron – that in many environments, a distance of 2 meters alone is not enough, and people can be infected when sharing a room. poorly ventilated with each other. “

Another advantage of the 2-meter distance is that it limits the number of people in indoor spaces, reducing the chances that an infectious person is present – and the number of people to whom they could transmit the virus. For the same reason, the return of social distancing would be very bad news for hotel companies.

Read the answers to the most frequently asked questions here:


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Lost World: How the reforestation plan sowed seeds of hope | Delhi News https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/lost-world-how-the-reforestation-plan-sowed-seeds-of-hope-delhi-news/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 22:55:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/lost-world-how-the-reforestation-plan-sowed-seeds-of-hope-delhi-news/ New Delhi: One of the two nurseries at Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary is going through a eureka moment. After much anticipation, permutation and combining botanical facts, one of two seeds obtained from a Guggal plant (Commiphora wightii), a rare specimen, finally germinated. One of 10 rare species of ‘conservation concern’ in the nation’s capital and […]]]>
New Delhi: One of the two nurseries at Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary is going through a eureka moment. After much anticipation, permutation and combining botanical facts, one of two seeds obtained from a Guggal plant (Commiphora wightii), a rare specimen, finally germinated.
One of 10 rare species of ‘conservation concern’ in the nation’s capital and a tree that was once part of Delhi’s centuries-old forest system, Guggal has reportedly been wiped out. However, this new sapling and about 1.8 lakh of other 120 species of trees, shrubs, grasses, grasses and vines, which include 69 native species that were either lost, rare or becoming uncommon, gave hope for a possible resurrection of Delhi’s lost flowers. glory.
For this, experts from the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) and the forestry department have a plan. The seed bank that helped germination will be used to plant saplings in a scientific way following an integrated reforestation approach.
Experts said that under this plan, the soil quality and the fertility value of the area will be determined. The sapling would then be planted. These would include 69 native or native species, of which 22 are rare and 10 of conservation concern.
“We have identified land in Devli Asila, Maidan Garhi, Neb Sarai, Bhatti and a few other places. The plots are being prepared and free from any encroachment. We started testing soil health and other factors before marking out the best-suited terrain for a specific tree species. This is done to ensure that the native species, which found it difficult to germinate, grow up healthy. We are trying to restore the lost glory to the forests of Delhi, ”said Sohail Madan of BNHS.
Madan pointed out that previously the plan had been drawn up to regenerate at least 22 native species, such as khair and peelu or miswak, which are very rare in Delhi. His team had to collect seeds from a specimen that enjoys ASI protection at Qutub Minar.
“Later, we increased the number of species and finalized a list of 120 trees, shrubs, grasses, grasses and lianas to give Delhi a floral variety. Of these 120 species, 69 are native and 10 are virtually extirpated from the city. They were once in abundance, but have become scarce over time. For example, Guggal was nearly wiped out not only from Delhi, but from the country. It is very rare in wild or urban forests. Due to its religious values, slaughter occurred on a large scale. It has almost disappeared from India, but is found in Pakistan. We were able to grow it here from a sample in the nursery, ”said Madan, adding that reforestation would start depending on the weather conditions appropriate for each species.
Currently, experts are assessing the health of the soils of more than a hundred sites where plantations will take place. To begin with, botanists test soil type, salinity, pH levels, moisture holding capacity, and attenuation.
Giving the example of the Salai tree (Boswellia serrata), a rare species, experts claimed that a soil with less moisture holding capacity, higher salinity and an upper area was best suited. so that it is cultivated, that too “sporadically”. ”As if growing in the wild.
“Not all the land has been released from encroachment and some has been taken from different departments. Our planning is at an advanced stage and we are working on reconnaissance of the terrain. This is the first reforestation campaign where we establish a relationship between nursery and plantation. The germination of the rare Guggal was an important part of it, ”said Amit Anand, deputy forest conservator (South).


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