Sound recordist – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 03:27:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Sound recordist – Chris Batson Music http://chrisbatsonmusic.com/ 32 32 This album of bird songs was a conservation hit https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/this-album-of-bird-songs-was-a-conservation-hit/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 13:34:48 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/this-album-of-bird-songs-was-a-conservation-hit/ A bird song album featuring endangered species was a hit in Australia. This is just one of the innovative ways that environmentalists are raising awareness. From dance projects to swimming feats, human stories help people engage with nature. Birdsong is beautiful, but is it rock and roll? Well, at the end of 2021 the Australian […]]]>
  • A bird song album featuring endangered species was a hit in Australia.
  • This is just one of the innovative ways that environmentalists are raising awareness.
  • From dance projects to swimming feats, human stories help people engage with nature.

Birdsong is beautiful, but is it rock and roll? Well, at the end of 2021 the Australian music industry was stunned when a digital album featuring the songs of native birds made it straight to the pre-Christmas music charts at number five.

In the week of December 13, following a successful social media campaign, Songs of Disappearance dropped established artists like Abba, Adele and The Weeknd to the Aria album charts.

With 53 of Australia’s most endangered bird species, it reached its highest position overall a week later at number three.

This Australian bird song album was a surprise contender on the Christmas charts.

This Australian bird song album was a surprise contender on the Christmas charts.

Image: Spotify

The project was produced by nature sound taker Dave Stewart and the Bowerbird Collective, a duo of musicians who create multimedia conservation stories designed to strengthen their audiences’ connection to nature.

“It’s absolutely amazing to have eliminated Michael Buble, Mariah Carey and a whole bunch of other really famous artists from the [top five]collective co-founder Anthony Albrecht, a doctoral student at Charles Darwin University (CDU), told ABC News.

“In some ways this is not surprising, as I think Australians are generally much more tuned in to the environmental crisis we all face – and faced by the unique and incredible species that also live in Australia.”

The album’s digital release highlighted a new study launched on December 1 by CDU and BirdLife Australia. The Australian Bird Action Plan 2020 indicates that 216 of Australia’s 1,299 bird species are currently threatened with extinction, 21 more than previously thought. Of the 77 species threatened by fires, 26 now face increased risk due to the 2019-2020 bushfires.

Songs of Disappearance is one of many innovative curatorial activities raising awareness around the world. Here are some other ways people connect with the public to get them involved in saving our planet.

Dancing for the oceans

Choreographer Tricia Greux uses dance to highlight the threat to our oceans.

Choreographer Tricia Greux uses dance to highlight the threat to our oceans.

Image: Anjolique Dance Company / Facebook

Tricia Greaux is a Marine Resources Officer responsible for the conservation of marine protected areas around the island state of Saint Kitts and Nevis in the Caribbean. She is also a dancer, choreographer and founder and director of the Compagnie de Danse Anjolique.

The group’s conservation dance projects include “Eat Lion Fish,” which encourages people to help reduce this invasive species by eating them, and “Protect the Narrows” which aims to support a conservation area spanning the strait in between. main islands.

Go almost naked for nature

Zoos South Australia's Conservation Uncovered Calendar raises funds and publicizes its projects.

Zoos South Australia’s Conservation Uncovered Calendar raises funds and publicizes its projects.

Image: ZoosSA

Zoos South Australia, a charity that supports Adelaide Zoo and Monarto Safari Park, was looking for a way to involve people in its conservation work. Inspired by near-nude calendars featuring farmers, firefighters and members of the Women’s Institute, her staff decided to create their own.

Titled Conservation Uncovered, the calendar features ‘tastefully stripped’ members of the charity’s team and aims to raise funds and raise awareness of the organization’s 25 conservation projects in Australia and around the world.

Swimming in the arctic

Environmental activist Lewis Pugh takes extreme feats to highlight the impact of climate change.

Environmental activist Lewis Pugh takes extreme feats to highlight the impact of climate change.

Image: Lewis Pugh Foundation

United Nations patron of the seas, Lewis Pugh, draws attention to the plight of the oceans by undertaking extreme swimming feats. In August 2021, he spent 12 days swimming 7.8 km through the Ilulissat Ice Fjord in Greenland in what has been described as “the coldest swim on the planet”.

“Data and science are absolutely crucial, but we’re not necessarily moved by the data, but by the human stories of what’s going on and the impact it will have on all of us,” said Pugh, a former young world leader of the World Economic Forum.



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The life and times of Bollywood’s greatest showman https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-life-and-times-of-bollywoods-greatest-showman/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 11:34:35 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-life-and-times-of-bollywoods-greatest-showman/ He was considered to be Bollywood’s greatest showman. Raj Kapoor lived up to this sobriquet very well. There was a determined cinema as it approached social issues, demolished taboos by flourishing its storytelling, and seemed well ahead of time. In a film industry decorated with a few iconic names, Kapoor was a colossus. Kapoor, Dilip […]]]>

He was considered to be Bollywood’s greatest showman. Raj Kapoor lived up to this sobriquet very well. There was a determined cinema as it approached social issues, demolished taboos by flourishing its storytelling, and seemed well ahead of time. In a film industry decorated with a few iconic names, Kapoor was a colossus.

Kapoor, Dilip Kumar, and Dev Anand gave the nation much to celebrate with their talent – there was romance and joy on screen. As Dilip Kumar won the title of King of Tragedy and Dev Anand was dubbed the Eternal Romantic, Kapoor was the detail-oriented artist, music connoisseur, and a connoisseur of the pulse of society.

When Rahul Rawail, who had worked as Kapoor’s assistant director, came up with the idea of ​​writing a tribute to the master filmmaker through a book, he compelled true film lovers. A report in this form was essential to bring out the crazy, strange, affable, unique genius that was Kapoor.

In Raj Kapoor, the master at work , Rawail succeeds in presenting some little-known aspects of the non-conformist filmmaker, actor-producer-director who has explored cinema as few have done. Written with the help of Pranika Sharma, it is a delightful reading experience for all Kapoor fans.

Rawail draws on her incredible memory and close association with Kapoor to reveal some hilarious anecdotes from her life. Kapoor the actor and Kapoor the director are two extremely attractive compartments that Rawail presents with immense clarity.

It would not be wrong to regard Kapoor as one of the greatest contributors to the popularization of cinema in free India. He tackles subjects that few have the courage to tackle. Mera Naam Joker, the story of a clown who makes others laugh while hiding his own sorrows, is a perfect example. It was a story close to his heart. It also became a heartbreaking story when the film failed. Today it has achieved cult film status and in the opinion of his eldest son, Randhir, it is a film that defines Kapoor the most.

“Raj Kapoor had his own brand of filmmaking. His ideas were always ahead of his time and his films reflected that. Mera Naam Joker was one of those examples. It was a major flop when it was released, but with time and people understanding what the film is about, it is now one of Raj Kapoor’s most beloved films… ”, writes Randhir in his foreword.

Kapoor made his directorial debut with Aag in 1948 and never looked back. His rise has been phenomenal, and as the book documents, music has remained an integral part of his cinema with impressive contributions from singer Mukesh and composers Shanker-Jaikishan. And Rawail doesn’t forget the pillars that have stood like stones behind Kapoor’s success – cinematographer Radhu Karmakar and sound recordist Allaudin Khan. We also learn in the book about the creators of the iconic RK Studio logo – a man playing the violin with a woman in his arms was designed by MR Achrekar and painted by Balasaheb Thackeray.

There was nothing Kapoor couldn’t do. He would become a most demanding makeup artist, lyricist, director, a breathtaking array of actor, someone who could instruct Lata Mangeshkar on the final notes of a song, and a great talent scout.

When Dimple Kapadia made an informal visit with her parents, Kapoor discovered in her the girl who could play Bobby. He chose Dimple over the objections of most of those present at the hearing, including Randhir Kapoor. “What I see in her is what you don’t have the capacity to see. That’s the difference between all of you and me, ”he said, ending all arguments. Dimple got the role opposite Rishi Kapoor and two stars were born as Bobby set screens on fire.

The most exciting chapter deals with Kapoor’s obsessions and eccentricities. Here, Rawail is at his best with first-hand experiences that bring out the showman’s obsession with drink, food, and movies. Rawail tells us about Kapoor’s love for Johnnie Walker Black Label which he collected during his overseas tours because he was not convinced of the authenticity of the brand available in India. “In fact, when he passed away and they opened his personal cabinet, there were only bottles of Black Label to be found and nothing else,” writes Rawail.

The most hilarious incident involved Kapoor sending his driver and insisting on walking home, at 3 a.m. from Bandra to Chembur. Rawail spotted Kapoor at a bus stop, without even the bus ticket in his pocket. When Rawail invited him to get in his car, Kapoor shouted at him, “I will only go by bus.” Rawail let him do it, but returned a bit later to check that he was okay and found him missing. He followed the route and was delighted to see Kapoor sitting in the front seat of a taxi, flanked by the driver and another passenger, his arms slung and a gamchha strapped around his head, humming.sun sahiba sun, pyaar ku dhun. “Eleven years later the song was featured in Ram Teri Ganga Maili.

Kapoor liked the food in small restaurants. It was common to see him eating pani-puri on the streets near Chembur station, dosa and medu-vada at a nearby South Indian restaurant, driving to Ghatkopar and Thane for the dal and the sheep, biryani at Coronation next to the Novelty cinema near Grant’s Road. “Arrangements were made to assign cars that would drive to various locations at different times to pick up food so that we all had ‘hot dishes’ to eat,” Rawail writes.

One of the incidents that emerges from the book is the narration of how Kapoor, while searching for a location, visited the Kashmir border area. He was escorted by a senior army officer and very quickly had visitors across the border – Pakistani soldiers were his fans too. Rawail also writes in detail about Kapoor’s handling of the Dimple-Rajesh Khanna marriage while filming Bobby and she revealed her pregnancy while filming a song.

Rawail ends with a touching chapter on Kapoor’s death and the funeral. “The flames engulfed the mortal remains of the Master and, as the fire rose, it heralded the birth of the immortal Raj Kapoor.”

(Vijay Lokapally is a journalist and freelance author)

About the book

Raj Kapoor: the master at work

Rahul Rawail & Pranika Sharma

Bloomsbury

Rs 699/245 pages (Hardcover)

Discover this book on Amazon


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Dubbed films give Tibetans a window to the world https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/dubbed-films-give-tibetans-a-window-to-the-world/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 02:46:37 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/dubbed-films-give-tibetans-a-window-to-the-world/ Participants attend a seminar on the history and achievements of dubbing and film production in the Tibet Autonomous Region in Lhasa. PALDEN NYIMA / CHINA DAILY The history and achievements of dubbing and film production in the Tibet Autonomous Region over the past 60 years were reviewed at a seminar in Lhasa, the regional capital, […]]]>

Participants attend a seminar on the history and achievements of dubbing and film production in the Tibet Autonomous Region in Lhasa. PALDEN NYIMA / CHINA DAILY

The history and achievements of dubbing and film production in the Tibet Autonomous Region over the past 60 years were reviewed at a seminar in Lhasa, the regional capital, last month.

Over 3,000 films and 50 TV series have been dubbed into Tibetan over the past six decades.

Some popular films that received the treatment, including The Founding of an Army, Amazing China and 40,000 Kilometers, have been screened at the same time as other Chinese provinces and autonomous regions, the Tibet Film Public Service Center, which has hosted the seminar, mentioned.

Zhang Jianhua, secretary of the Center Party, said that with the support of Changchun Film Studio, China’s first film production company based in Jilin province, Tibet began exploring dubbing in 1957.

“A Tibetan dubbing crew was formed in the region in 1965, and the first Tibetan dubbed film was produced,” he said. “Since then, more and more films are available.

“They have provided scientific knowledge to farmers and shepherds and enriched the spiritual life of residents.”

This year, the center translated 93 films: 30 scientific and educational documentaries and 63 feature films.

Tsering Yudron, deputy head of the Tibetan Language Committee’s regional office, said Tibetan-language dubbing is a key part of China’s ethnic film work, and the regional government views it as an important cultural endeavor.

“The regional government has given great support in the areas of building facilities, cultivating talents and upgrading equipment,” Tsering Yudron said, adding that dubbing has greatly contributed to social stability and high-quality development of the region.

Wang Yifeng, director of the dubbing center of the state production base of China Film Group, said that China has started dubbing public service films in different languages ​​to bridge ethnic groups, enrich the cultural life and expand people’s exposure to innovation, poverty reduction and society transformation.

“By dubbing more films into the languages ​​of different ethnic groups, people can learn more about national policies and knowledge related to science, culture, security, health, and social and economic development,” Wang said.

Socho Drolma, a voice actress at the Tibet Film Public Service Center, said the working conditions were terrible when the dub started, with the sound insulation in the dubbing room so bad that the sounds of birds and chickens were heard. recorded with the original soundtrack.

Socho Drolma, who was born into a rural family, started working for the region’s film company after graduating from college in 1965.

She said she had to take on different roles, including that of a translator, performer, projectionist and sound engineer, as well as a voice actress.

“Films with Tibetan soundtracks have become popular among farmers and herders,” she said. “The lack of transportation did not prevent them from traveling long distances to watch films; they even came on horseback and on the back of yaks.

Basang Norbu, a sound engineer at the center, said the number of staff working on dubbing increased from four in 1965 to 36.

“Over the years, dubbing has always been about giving audiences the chance to watch movies, providing them with good entertainment and making them understand the meaning of movies,” he said.

“For decades, these dubbed films have been a window for Tibetans to get to know the outside world.”


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Loki’s madness is the future of punk! Siblings Ages 11-20 Drop First Single / Video “No Right” https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/lokis-madness-is-the-future-of-punk-siblings-ages-11-20-drop-first-single-video-no-right/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 19:06:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/lokis-madness-is-the-future-of-punk-siblings-ages-11-20-drop-first-single-video-no-right/ Loki’s madness Unique cover of Loki’s Folly “No Right” by Laura F. Bennett Art Three Minneapolis kids went to a local music store to learn how to play their instruments. Now, they carry the torch of the legends of their hometown before them. MINNEAPOLIS, MN, USA, January 2, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ – January 1, 2022 For […]]]>

Loki’s madness

"No right"

Unique cover of Loki’s Folly “No Right” by Laura F. Bennett Art

Three Minneapolis kids went to a local music store to learn how to play their instruments. Now, they carry the torch of the legends of their hometown before them.

MINNEAPOLIS, MN, USA, January 2, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ – January 1, 2022 For immediate release
Re: Loki’s Folly “No Right” Single Release Date: Jan. 7
Release date of the album “Sisu”: May 20

Loki’s Folly is an indie-punk trio made up of two young sisters and their little brother from South Minneapolis who love to play loud music that makes them happy. In the tradition of the Minnesota bands that came before them like Husker Du, the power trio produces a very big sound of their own.

When Loki’s Folly plays, they take you to a world that is unmistakably theirs. It’s a universe where influences like Sleater Kinney best meet the Swedish kulning tradition. In fact, their new single “No Right” features the kulning girls in the bridge for a very unique and in a way very punk rock effect.

Annie (20) plays guitar and sings. Nissa (15) plays the drums and sings. Oskar (11) maintains the bass with his bass guitar while perched on his amplifier. Each brings their own unique personality to the music and their sound is gelled by the mixing of the voices of their siblings singing together. The group was initially formed from children taking lessons separately at Twin Town Guitars. They started taking their classes together, and after a handful of sessions, Loki’s Folly was born!

It wasn’t long before people outside the practice space started to take notice.

Their energetic and passionate concerts have attracted a dedicated fan base of longtime Minnesota musicians. Soul Asylum, Run Westy Run, Haley, The Melismatics, Ryan and Pony, and Porcupine have all featured them on local shows for the past two years. Dave Pirner (Soul Asylum) even appears as a guest guitarist on an upcoming single “Appease The Girl”. They were also included in First Avenue’s best new bands showcase.

Then the buzz started to spread nationwide.

Todd Trainer (ranked among the 100 greatest drummers by Spin) of legendary independent group Shellac took note. Shellac, which also includes recorder Steve Albini and Bob Weston, then invited Loki’s Folly to join them on tour. The young group’s fan base began to expand beyond their hometown limits.
“No Right” (released January 7, 2022) is the official first single from the upcoming full album “Sisu”. The track also has an official music video.

“Sisu” will be released worldwide on May 20, 2022 and they will celebrate with a performance on the legendary First Avenue in Minneapolis on Saturday May 21 at the opening of Shellac.

Ryan smith
High voltage records
+1 6127034972
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Loki’s Folly – “No Right” (Official Music Video)



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HKFP Focus: Katherine Cheng Explores Relationships With Nature Through Hong Kong Botany https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/hkfp-focus-katherine-cheng-explores-relationships-with-nature-through-hong-kong-botany/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/hkfp-focus-katherine-cheng-explores-relationships-with-nature-through-hong-kong-botany/ In dense urban areas like Hong Kong, the human connection to nature can sometimes seem distant. Concrete blocks and glass skyscrapers surround the city center, interrupted only by carefully organized gardens and nature parks. With the relentless pressures of Covid-19 and political tensions, many have turned to the outdoors for a bit of peace. This […]]]>

In dense urban areas like Hong Kong, the human connection to nature can sometimes seem distant. Concrete blocks and glass skyscrapers surround the city center, interrupted only by carefully organized gardens and nature parks.

With the relentless pressures of Covid-19 and political tensions, many have turned to the outdoors for a bit of peace.

This series, by photographer Katherine Cheng, explores the experiences of Hong Kong people who reconstruct a relationship with nature through their five senses – sight, hearing, smell, touch and taste. Local flora has been used to showcase Hong Kong’s history and ecosystems.


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Eli Schwebel’s new song for victims of abuse and silence https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/eli-schwebels-new-song-for-victims-of-abuse-and-silence/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 05:37:30 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/eli-schwebels-new-song-for-victims-of-abuse-and-silence/ Watch: Music Artist Eli schwebel released the song “Stand For You” about caring for those who have been abused, silenced and humiliated. “This is the story of people close to me, and this is my story,” he said. Video Musical artist and composer Eli schwebel writing : Four months ago my close friend, executive producer […]]]>

Watch: Music Artist Eli schwebel released the song “Stand For You” about caring for those who have been abused, silenced and humiliated. “This is the story of people close to me, and this is my story,” he said. Video

Musical artist and composer Eli schwebel writing :

Four months ago my close friend, executive producer Israel Schachter, shared his vision of telling a story that will educate our communities about the rescue work being done by Amudim.

“Stand For You” is the result of our collaboration. It is the story of an intimate relationship with those who are abused, silenced and ashamed. It’s the story of people close to me, and it’s my story.

Ironically, it’s a story we had to tell without telling it.

LYRICS:

I could see it in your eyes
There was something you were hiding
You held deep inside you
You were fighting all alone

All the nights you went to bed
Under the covers you were crying
With his words in your head
He stole your innocence

When you feel like hope is lost
And you don’t know where to go
Or who to call

i will be for you
We can face the world together
If we raise our voice
And make the choice
To learn to live again

i will be for you
When you need me more than ever
We will face the truth
And find a new way through

i will be for you

As long as you can remember
You had problems in your mind
But at the bottom of the bottle
You left them all behind

You said you would surrender
All you needed was more time
But the days have turned to years
And your promise turned to lies

When you feel like hope is lost
And you don’t know where to go
Or who to call

i will be for you
We can face the world together
If we raise our voice
And make the choice
To learn to live again

i will be for you
When you need me more than ever
We will face the truth
And find a new way through

i will be for you

And I love you enough that you hate me for it

i will be for you
We can face the world together
If we raise our voice
And make the choice
To learn to live again

i will be for you
When you need me more than ever
We will face the truth
And find a new way through

We will be for you

VIDEO: Stand For You – Eli Schwebel

CREDITS:

Generously sponsored by Charity Bids
Executive producer: Israel Schachter
Written, arranged and performed by Eli Schwebel
Co-written by Christian Dupree
Co-arrangements, synths, keyboards, bass, programming by Cale Hawkins
Piano: Eli Schwebel
Guitars: Oz Noy
Pre-production and editing: Assaf Spector
Mixed and mastered by Nick Squillante
Ropes led by Yitzy Spinner
Orchestra: Yoed Nir, Earl Maneein, Gabe Terracciano, Fung Chern Hwei, Andie Tanning, Ali Belli
Jennifer DeVore, Bryan Wilson, Paul Swensen
Drums at the cinema: Chemy Soibelman
Guitar in the movies: Rob Ritchie

Video produced and directed by Yeeshai Gross
Associate producer: Yitzy Spinner
Directors of photography: Peter Pavlakis, Chris Seerveld
Edited by: Chris Seerveld
Production Team: Eric Smith, Emily Dombroff, Stuart Solomon, Charlie Hung
Location Sound engineer: Ryan Metz
Special thanks to Frank and Camille’s Piano’s, Great Neck Synagogue, Mark Twersky, Fran Gross, Avi Feder


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The person who helped me through 2021: Monty Don inspired my new obsessive love of gardening | Life and style https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-person-who-helped-me-through-2021-monty-don-inspired-my-new-obsessive-love-of-gardening-life-and-style/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-person-who-helped-me-through-2021-monty-don-inspired-my-new-obsessive-love-of-gardening-life-and-style/ YesThere are ears, I got my new eyeglasses back and went home looking like someone who had time traveled since the pre-airplane era: I didn’t know trees had leaves individual pieces that could be seen from the ground. Before 2020, I had never noticed the gardens either: they were things the old people loved and […]]]>

YesThere are ears, I got my new eyeglasses back and went home looking like someone who had time traveled since the pre-airplane era: I didn’t know trees had leaves individual pieces that could be seen from the ground. Before 2020, I had never noticed the gardens either: they were things the old people loved and the neighborhood dads mowed all the time. The garden adjoining my apartment only became interesting if a fox was standing there. Then the lockdown took place and the people who usually kept the vines and trees from eating the building stopped coming. I tried to sort it out on my own, pathetically Google searching for what was supposed to be there and what was an alien plant invasion. Somehow I ended up watching Gardeners’ World.

I don’t remember the first episode I saw, nor the first time I heard Monty Don talk about elephant garlic. I had never heard of a “sweet pea” outside of the Popeye cartoons, but I remember Monty telling us their scent was intoxicating. I learned that the flowers that looked like living spirographs were called dahlias and that tulips and daffodils, welcome views of spring and harbinger of heat, only come to life if they have been left in. cold all winter.

During the year my interest grew. My boyfriend gave me Monty Don’s book catalog for my birthday, including one from the ’90s where he’s still called Montagu. Very quickly, I became totally unavailable on Friday evening, mentally or physically; if Monty was in the pond with his waders on, even the cat was ignored. Whatever horrors took place in the news, the birds were chirping in Longmeadow and Monty was there among them, a calming presence when everything else was on fire.

“The BBC made the decision to continue filming Gardeners’ World, and I still see it as wartime,” Monty says, when I call him to tell him about the spooky sanctuary I erected in his honor ( just kidding. I would never tell him). “They had to entertain the troops. So I was the Vera Lynn of Covid. There is a pause and he laughs. “I’m going to regret saying that.”

In Longmeadow, where Gardeners’ World is filmed, the BBC installed five miles of wiring and blocked off the drive with four metal containers that served as isolation pods for the cameraman, sound engineer, director and electrician. It stayed that way until July 2021. Monty was alone in his backyard – Vera Lynn with a walkie-talkie, remote cameras, and an invisible audience. “I really didn’t like filming during the lockdown; there was no fun. When you shoot with a crew, it becomes a creative and collaborative process. But I felt, in a pretty old fashioned way, that I was doing my part. I ask him what got him through the year if he couldn’t watch Gardeners’ World like all of us. “I lapped Succession. I saw the first two seasons twice.

When the first containment started, I had no idea that for the next 18 months I would only be thinking about the garden, that I would one day be a person with a pre-order of spring bulbs. I’m not, statistically speaking, unusual: My newfound interest alongside banana bread and sourdough is one of the great pandemic clichés. According to the Garden Retail Monitor of the Horticultural Trades Association (HTA), garden centers at one point reported a 34% increase in sales from pre-pandemic times, and they are still trading at 25% more than ‘in 2019. Gardeners’ World itself has had an influx of new viewers.

“I don’t think it came out of nowhere,” Monty says of the surge in interest. “It was a slow burn; circumstances suddenly gave it a bloom. Over the past five years or so, there has been a growing movement of interested people. It is the interface with the natural world that most people have. At last count, 88% of Britons had access to a garden or outdoor space. But before the pandemic, many saw their backyard as an obstacle, something else to keep in order. “They didn’t see it as a creative opportunity. I think that’s what the lockdown did, ”he said. “It opened up the possibilities of a garden.”

The lockdown also opened up possibilities for what the BBC would broadcast: Monty appealed to viewers to upload videos of their own gardens – to fill spaces on the program where presenters would normally go further. They received 10,000 videos in the first year. While they’ve always included three episodes throughout the 2021 series, the majority have never been shown. The videos are a fascinating, uplifting, at times heartbreaking glimpse into people’s reduced lives. There was this woman in Warsaw who had filled her tiny fourth-floor balcony until the walls could not be seen, but left a window for her dog to look out, like a mouse door in the bedroom. baseboard. There was the 84-year-old woman who recounted how, for the first time, she started a garden while being aware of her own mortality; she wanted mature trees because she didn’t think she had time to wait and see them grow. And there were the doctors and nurses on a Covid ward who had discovered that the stifling environment of the hospital office created the perfect conditions for growing the kind of vegetables they remembered from their childhood in the Philippines. They had Chinese bitter gourds standing up against the windows, ripening in the sun.

“I think what comes out of all of this are people just sharing fun,” says Monty. Her own favorites include a 90-year-old woman who “didn’t quite say it, but meant,” Damn, I’m gonna do whatever I want “” and the contagious joy of sisters with Down’s syndrome. who wrote him a poem. “You can ignore them and call them simple pleasures, but they’re not: they’re really deep and rich pleasures, and they’re intensely complicated because they strike so close to where true happiness is. “

When Gardeners’ World ended for the year last fall, I was helpless. I watched old episodes and pretended it was spring. I looked out the window and wanted the daffodils to grow. All I wanted was a one-time special where Monty wore a chunky sweater and showed us his houseplants. I couldn’t stand the fact that the light that had seen me through the horrors of the pandemic was fading, just as the clocks were changing and the world was darkening. This year, when I watched Monty fill pots with tulip bulbs and prepare the garden for another winter, the only thing that grew was the feeling of dread in my stomach. He was about to leave.

“I don’t think programmers really understand gardens, gardening, or the public,” he says. “They see it like, ‘Well the season is over, it’s October and it’s wintry. Obviously, no one is interested in gardening in the winter, so we don’t put gardening outside. What they don’t realize is that they are gardeners. Gardening doesn’t quit their lives just because Gardeners’ World goes extinct, nor does food quit people’s lives because Bake Off finishes a race. The loss was obviously not felt by me alone. This year the BBC is running winter specials – something it hasn’t done in a decade.

The world is more interesting thanks to Monty. I tell her that I can name the plants in the gardens as I come across them, that I can make an informed guess at how much care is given to their lives. I know trees share food and maybe spread information through their root systems to alert others of disease or danger – and now that I know this is all happening under my feet and well above my head I’ll never forget. As the poet Mary Oliver wrote: “Attention is the beginning of devotion. “Ah,” he laughs. “Now you are the smart one who knows. “


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“The Long Goodbye” awarded at the Oscars https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-long-goodbye-awarded-at-the-oscars/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 18:12:19 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/the-long-goodbye-awarded-at-the-oscars/ Riz Ahmed in the short film The Long Goodbye. The long goodbye, a breathtaking short film from the director and co-writer Aneil Karia and star and co-writer Ahmed Rice, was shortlisted for the Oscars. The uncompromising film takes the impact of institutional racism to its extreme nightmare and has been described as a “wake-up call […]]]>

Riz Ahmed in the short film The Long Goodbye.

The long goodbye, a breathtaking short film from the director and co-writer Aneil Karia and star and co-writer Ahmed Rice, was shortlisted for the Oscars. The uncompromising film takes the impact of institutional racism to its extreme nightmare and has been described as a “wake-up call against rising intolerance”.

The long goodbye sees Ahmed playing Rice who, along with his family, is planning a wedding celebration. Then events take a sudden and dramatic turn and the very existence of the family is called into question by the presence of a group of armed mercenaries. Riz and her family appear to be the target of a state-led slaughter against minority groups.

Karia’s film takes us on a journey that is both intimate and devastating. The 11-minute short is a flawless look at a possible horrific future and what is happening for minorities as we speak in many countries around the world.

Ahmed, who won an Emmy Award for his lead performance on HBO The night of, said he couldn’t “explain how much it means to have The long goodbye shortlisted for the Oscars, ”thanking Academy voters and all who had supported the film.

“Aneil [Karia] and I did it from the heart, ”continued Ahmed, who was recently nominated for Oscars, Golden Globes and SAG for his main performance in The sound of metal. Ahmed broke new ground by becoming the first Muslim to be nominated for lead actor at the Oscars and the first to win a lead actor Emmy. “It’s amazing how connected he is with other people. I hope this continues to spread, that it will be a wake-up call and the world can see who phenomenal filmmaker Aneil Karia is.

Karia said he was grateful at the Oscars for recognizing a film that came from “such a personal and urgent place” by giving it “that kind of recognition”. The film has already achieved numerous successes on the festival circuit, including winning an award at the prestigious Hollyshorts in Los Angeles and winning the best short film at the British Independent Film Awards.

Its impact extended far beyond screens and it was mentioned in the UK Parliament as “must-see” soon after its release. Karia, whose debut feature Surge won a jury award at the Sundance Film Festival, is a rising star in British independent film. He started his career directing several award-winning short films, including To beat featuring Ben Whishaw, and his short film financed by Film4 Job who was nominated for a BAFTA and a BIFA.

Watch The Long Goodbye

Movie Details:

Director: Aneil Karia
Created by: Aneil Karia & Riz Ahmed

Producer: Tom Gardner
Executive Producers: Scott O’Donnell, Tim Nash, Sally Campbell, Seth Wilson, Saskia Whinney, Caroline Reason, Astrid Ferguson
Production manager: Maddy Perkins
Production assistant: Chloe Slattery

Director of Photography: Stuart Bentley
Publisher: Amanda James
Casting Director: Shaheen Baig
Additional Casting: Roxanne Farahmand
Production Designer: Ruth Crawford
Costume designer: Holly Rebecca
Hair and Makeup: Lisa Mustafa
Conductor: Bill Rae Smith
1st announcement: Hayley Williams
Site manager: Amrit Sahotay
Stunt coordinators: Marc Cass & John Street
Sound recordist: Nadine Richardson

TO THROW

Rice – Ahmed Rice
Aminah – Hussina Raja
Dad – Javed Hashmi
Mom – Sudha Bhuchar
Karim – Rish Shah
Aisha: – Ambreen Razia
Khadija – Taru Devani
Sana – Reynah Rita Oppal
Brother’s Friend – Nikkita Chadha
Fatima – Asmara Gabrielle
Farheen – Marissa Hussain
Nas – Leon Ung


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“Fall race” | Local filmmaker creates fascinating film – Times-Standard https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/fall-race-local-filmmaker-creates-fascinating-film-times-standard/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 11:35:24 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/fall-race-local-filmmaker-creates-fascinating-film-times-standard/ I have to admit I had no idea how I would react to seeing the film adaptation of the intriguing drama “Autumn Run” by longtime Eureka resident and talented playwright Susan Bigelow Marsh which premiered. world on stage in 2001 in his plays. Live performance space above the Lost Coast Brewery in Eureka. The original […]]]>

I have to admit I had no idea how I would react to seeing the film adaptation of the intriguing drama “Autumn Run” by longtime Eureka resident and talented playwright Susan Bigelow Marsh which premiered. world on stage in 2001 in his plays. Live performance space above the Lost Coast Brewery in Eureka.

The original screenplay was co-created by Bigelow Marsh with Janice Goldberg, his artistic collaborator on a number of plays first produced at PIP (and directed by Goldberg, originally from New York). It was then successfully staged by companies across the country, all of which I reviewed for The Times-Standard or Humboldt Beacon.

However, “Autumn Run” has always stood out for me above the rest, and at the time it was my choice as “Beti’s Outstanding Outstanding Production 2001”. He has earned this well-deserved recognition across the art board for a number of reasons:

• The intelligently constructed “mysterious” scenario.

• The four main actors who played the estranged brothers of a family.

• A major supporting actress (whose ‘questionable way of death’ plot has turned and turned).

• Equally noteworthy was the demanding stage design with a “real river with running water”. It flowed past the family’s now vacant fishing and hunting hut, built with open walls, which exposed the action going on inside.

• There was also live music played and sung by one of the actors, which was interspersed in and out of the action, but (like all dialogue) was always constantly underlined by the white noise of running water. of the river during its “Autumn Run” of unseen salmon returning home to complete part of their life cycle – just as family members were brought back to end an unanswered tragedy that had taken an impact over their lives for 10 long years apart.

All of the above is obviously what fascinated accomplished local actress / producer / director Carol Lang so much that she felt inspired to ask playwrights (at one point almost 20 years ago) ‘they would give him permission to adapt the script of the play into one for a movie. They did it.

Although the talented Bigelow Marsh sadly passed away in 2013, Goldberg was still available in 2021 to give Lang (and his film adaptation collaborator, Dawn Bressler) the artistic / creative contribution regarding their film version (finally ready. to produce) of “Autumn Run.” It was one that would be produced entirely by a talented cast and crew of Humboldt County actors, technicians and musicians.

The end result of what has become a three-year artistic adventure for Lang was the film which premiered last week. It took place at the historic Arcata Minor Theater (in the midst of a steady downpour of enough rain to “revive” a dry riverbed for a salmon run). The intimate venue, with its large screen and excellent sound system, was ideal for the early days of the film live (masked) with the audience.

James Gadd, Jesse March, Queena DeLany and AJ Hempstead star in “Autumn Run”. (Courtesy of Clang Productions)

However, as I discovered before the screening after watching a video provided by Lang (who not only co-adapted, but produced and directed the film), the original script for the scene had (courtesy Goldberg) been changed in some key aspects of the characters. Now there were no longer four brothers in the separated family, but three brothers and a sister.

Obviously, this changes the gender dynamics in their already turbulent family relationships which give the storyline different nuances in how they behave towards each other, and (perhaps, more so) why – because they now have to. decide whether or not to sell the old vacation. cabin in order to “bury the memories of the violence that occurred there”.

It also means that the all-out macho vibe of the brothers still competing (to live up to their late father’s “outdoor” character) has now become a less obvious defining aspect to which each of them (including their fiery sister) apparently still sucks. up to the task by revisiting the family cabin by the river and the surrounding forest.

Another important change has been made to the order in which the plot begins. The action of the film now opens by the riverside with a shocking “accidental” of a girl. gunshot death (one of the brothers being the “apparent shooter”) which only occurs in the room towards the very end. Therefore, the movie goes back and forth between past and current events and challenges you to keep up.

There was also another key, a supporting character added – a Native American sage named White Hawk, whose words to the brother sentenced to prison for the shooting, are now the basis for his actions back to finally share the truth of his actions: “Go back as far as necessary to move forward.” “

All of the above is as much as I want to tell you about what happens during this turbulent history of a broken family and each member’s passionate journey to hopefully heal their individual and collective pain and anger when ‘they admit and find out what is true. . While love can’t always conquer everything, at least sometimes understanding can.

So, do the film’s re-imagined changes to the characters and the flow of the hidden reveal of the tragic plot question alter the emotional impact of the original version on stage? My answer to that is a firm ‘no’. It’s also well done and poignantly powerful – from the well-chosen actors themselves who inhabit their roles with fundamentally solid performances. (Although the real star of the show is the breathtaking beauty of the setting of the Mattole River Valley itself – photographed perfectly by Matt St. Charles.)

Is it a technically perfect effort, for the first time, on the big screen anytime? Not always. The sound mix (when the actors speak) sometimes sound hollow, and the obviously extremely talented actors still seemed to occasionally exchange cues in a room rather than

Pictured is the poster for the local movie “Autumn Run”. The film was produced and directed by Carol Lang. (Courtesy of Clang Productions)

have credible conversations with each other.,

However, it’s interesting that previous “non-actor” Joseph LeMieux delivers his few essential and memorable lines as White Hawk with surprising natural skill. This is an unexpected real diamond in the rough in the cast.

Shot on location at the Mattole Camp and Retreat Center (with strict COVID-19 precautions in place) last November in a remarkably short 15-day filming schedule, the actors had been picked and in rehearsal several months in advance (at except Jesse March) so that they are well prepared for their roles. And, they stayed put with the film crew from start to finish, continuing their scene rehearsals between shooting scenes.

Either way, the following lists the names of that fearless and fearless cast and production team (as well as those who did all the post-production work to visually and soundly improve what was done on location):

• Main roles of “Autumn Run”: Brothers – James Gadd (Rob), AJ Hempstead (Rob) and Jesse March (James) and Sister Queena DeLany (Philomena)

• Great supporting roles: Marguerite Hockaday (Tracy) and Joseph LeMieux (White Hawk)

• Minor secondary roles: Ranae Zeller (Little Ben), Valerie Sanford (Mother) and Spike (Chien / Kalani).

The film was produced and directed by Carol Lang for CLANG Productions and the executive producer is Dawn Bressler. It was adapted for film by screenwriters Lang and Bressler (based on the play by Susan Bigelow Marsh and Janice Goldberg). Associate producers are Howard Lang, Alan Olmstead and Laura Rhinehart.

The director of photography and lighting was Matt St. Charles; first assistant camera / gaffer, David Thompson; sound engineer, Bruce Paz, Northjetty Productions; Film Editor, Music Supervisor, Sound Design, Animation and Color Grading Director, Alan Olmstead, Sirius Studios; music, John Howarth, David Lynn Grimes and Jeffrey Smoller; design director and owner of properties, Laura Rhinehart; costume designer, Denise Ryles; costume assistant, Rosemary Smith; makeup artist / designer, Karen Echegaray; production assistant, Kira Gallaway; script supervisor, Jake Holper; boom operator, Kevin Harris; handle, Corwin Shrewsbury; and motorcycle education, Jack Ridlon.

All in all, there were only a few production adjustments needed to get this promising first film produced by CLANG Productions ready for Lang’s “Autumn Run” submission to some existing small film festivals looking for new ones. works by new local film companies.

It’s certainly already an exciting murder mystery film (appropriate for mature audiences, due to the many four-letter words added to the play’s original dialogue), which still holds your interest.

So, heed the wisdom of White Hawk and “Come back as far as you want to go forward” and watch his trailer on YouTube.

But, before you do that, find out about all of its intriguing background details at autumnrunmovie.com.

As Lang promised underage audiences during a question-and-answer session that took place right after the film ended (along with several other cast and crew members), this will be the first of local talents that she intends to create. She is certainly a determined local artist, who may well be on her way to eventual film success if she continues to see it through. Once you experience Lang’s movie for yourself, you’ll believe it, too.

And, I’m also sure if Bigelow Marsh was still around, she would give her artistic blessing to the fascinating film that her piece became when she premiered her 2021 “Autumn Run”.


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McCullough Library Hosts New Years Cello Concert Eve Party | Community news https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/mccullough-library-hosts-new-years-cello-concert-eve-party-community-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 22:05:00 +0000 https://chrisbatsonmusic.com/mccullough-library-hosts-new-years-cello-concert-eve-party-community-news/ BENNINGTON – A local library invites everyone to ring in the New Year with music at an upcoming virtual event. The McCullough Library has scheduled their virtual cello concert at 7 p.m. on December 31. The event will be webcast on the library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/mcculloughfreelibrary. Cellist Michael Finckel will perform The John G. […]]]>

BENNINGTON – A local library invites everyone to ring in the New Year with music at an upcoming virtual event. The McCullough Library has scheduled their virtual cello concert at 7 p.m. on December 31.

The event will be webcast on the library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/mcculloughfreelibrary.

Cellist Michael Finckel will perform The John G. McCullough Free Library, The Left Bank and Blue Rider Productions. The McCullough Library is working with Blue Rider Events and The Left Bank to ensure this tradition adapts to these changing times.

The Watch Party will feature cellist Michael Finckel, who will perform a Bach suite and other cello works.

The concert will be recorded and edited by master folk musician, music historian and video and sound veteran Steve Gillette, whose work can be found at AbouttheSong.com.

Originally from Bennington, Michael Finckel comes from a family of musicians. Both of her parents were teachers and performers of music. Finckel, now based in New York, is a soloist, chamber musician, composer, teacher and conductor. He currently teaches at the Mannes School of Music in New York City and, for over 25 years, was the conductor and musical director of North Bennington’s Sage City Symphony, one of the nation’s most distinguished community orchestras.

The concert is free, although donations are appreciated and help keep the series alive. Donations can be sent to the McCullough Library, PO Box 339, North Bennington, VT 05257. Checks should be made payable to “McCullough Free Library” with “Concert” in the memo line at the bottom.

For any questions, contact Jennie Rozycki at 802-447-7121.


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